The Wild Flowers of Spring. વસંતના ફૂલ story.

                                                The Wild Flowers of Spring              Saryu Parikh

            Five different races, religions, and cultures, and a story of our friendship.The Wild Flowers…. More

My Books

My Books

  1. “Essence of Eve નીતરતી સાંજ” Poems and True Stories in Gujarati and English, and Dilip’s Paintings. 2011

2. “Smile in Tears આંસુમાં સ્મિત”  Poems and Stories–followed by poems, in English and   Gujarati. 2013

3. “Moist Petals” a poetic novel– fictional memoir. 2015

4. “Flutter of Wings” a poetic novel. 2017

5. “MANTRA” poems in English and Gujarati.  2017

6. “મંત્ર” કાવ્ય સંગ્રહ. 2018
———-

ચિત્ર

Sujata-a face in his paintings ચિત્રોમાં એક ચહેરો

Sujata – a face in his paintings

I had always seen my friend, Sujata, surrounded by some admiring girlfriends and worshiping boys in our neighborhood playground.  It was 1958, when I was a dreamy-eyed twelve-year-old, and my friend Sujata was three years older than I. We all wanted to be her best friend and felt privileged when we could stand next to her. She knew how to please the people around her. She was a very good athlete, a clever student with a charming personality. Some used to compare her to the contemporary film star, Nutan.

In spite of the three-year age difference, we became best friends. I did not bribe Sujata with any special gifts or a fruit from my garden. Of course, having a good-looking older brother might have helped. An awkward, clueless young girl as I was, I learned from Sujata how to be sweet and make friends. Every evening, boys and girls played at our neighborhood playground.  We used to get a kick out of telling her which older boy was staring at her. Her response would be a hidden smile. She loved all that attention.

Sujata graduated from high school and joined an art college. She was very successful in sports, dance and in her studies. Later, we were not very close, but I would hear about her love affairs and her brothers beating up the guys to keep them away from Sujata.  But our friends felt that she was making good choices. One boy was very right for her, but her family would not allow a union. After she graduated from college, Sujata went away to live with her sister in another city for some time.
Then one day, her marriage was arranged. It was disheartening to see her being pressured to say “yes” to a man of her family’s choice. I met him at their wedding. Some younger, crude friends started joking, “Sujata, he looks so dull – if you slap him, he would not say anything.”  One sister of the groom heard the comments and protested sharply, “Don’t you dare. Our brother is not like that.” I said, “Our Sujata is not someone who would slap anyone.” But the damage was done, and Sujata felt ashamed.
But, unfortunately it happened the other way around – the groom hit our Sujata. She came back to her parents’ home after a month or so. She was very upset and refused to return to her in-laws’ house. It was a big scandal. Her mother-in-law came to take her back, and after some tricks, threats, and promises, Sujata had to return.  After that, every time I saw her my heart ached for her and my mind questioned, “Is this the same Sujata?”  The last time I saw her was with her six-month-old-baby. She said, “This baby has brought some joy to my life.”

A few years later, I moved to the USA from India and did not meet Sujata again for several years.  I heard that Sujata had two daughters and was living a somber life.
We were in California. My life was full with two lively children, my parents-in-law, and other family members in the house. One time, some friends of my father-in-law came to visit from northern California. We were talking about my hometown, and he asked me whether I knew Sujata! When I told them that she was my friend, they told me a story which shook me up.
The elderly uncle said, “We have one artist named Ritik in our neighborhood who still worships Sujata after all these years.”
I did not know this fellow because they had met when Sujata stayed with her older sister in another town, but I had heard his name. He had gone to school in a different city but was from the same town and caste as Sujata.  As soon as he found out about me, Ritik called. He wanted to know all about Sujata. Then he requested, “Can you please, mail a letter for me from your address and also receive Sujata’s reply at your address? I don’t want to create any problem for her.”
Wow! I was puzzled by this new romantic complication. Anyway, I agreed and a few letters passed back and forth through my hand. After several months the letters stopped. During a visit to India I met Sujata briefly. She inquired about Ritik, but I did not have any information. I asked her a few questions before we bid goodbye.
With another twist of circumstances, Ritik and our family moved to the same city, and we were invited to his exhibition of paintings. We established a connection. After a few weeks, we sat down for a long talk.
Ritik’s life had been hanging by a thread named Sujata. He said, “In my paintings, do you recognize her face? The day I met Sujata was like a planned event by the stars up above. I believed that Destiny had Her hand in bringing us together. It was love at first sight for me. I met her several times and expressed my feelings and hoped to spend our lives together. I had a hard time reading her thoughts. She was casually agreeing with my feelings and was sweet to me. I made her a painting and presented it to her. Her sister did not look very pleased with our friendship but did not say anything. Sujata was inquiring about my finances and education, which were quite modest. The day came when she had to go back to her parents’ home. I asked, ‘What about us? I love you. Can I come to your house and ask your parents for your hand in marriage?’ She said, ‘My parents will not agree and my brothers will beat you up badly. I cannot displease my family.’ I was devastated.  I had sort of written away my life to her name.  With time, I realized that she had been making up excuses. Maybe she was not committed to this relationship as I had been. But it was too late for me to return to my old self.”
In India, the conversation I had had with Sujata flashed in my mind. I had asked her, ‘Why did you marry this guy instead of Ritik?’ She confessed, ‘I was envious of the girls around me marring the rich guys – so greed clouded my judgment and I agreed to marry an engineer instead of an artist.’
I asked about the letters. Ritik said, “When I wrote the first letter, I was skeptical, but when I received her reply, I felt that on the branch of my mute life the birds started to sing. She said that she had been thinking about me often and missed being with me. As communications continued, she begged me to make arrangements to bring her to America with her two teenage daughters. That proposal made me look at this revived fling differently. I am secretly corresponding with someone’s wife! And I stopped.

So, in this lifetime, I feel rich that I have loved someone. I am not alone because in the corner of my heart Sujata is there. I look and see her face in my paintings. The question does not arise whether she loved me or not because, for me, the reality is that I will always love her.”

Her face in my paintings…
She loved me, she loved me not,
The question does not prick anymore.
Her presence is here like a twinkle in a star,
I am out of her circle, a far-fallen star.

She came into my life, I felt it destined,
Left her shadow melted barely with mine.
Those were the days–tepid, trivial for her.
They still trim colors for this lifelong dreamer.

I offered her a simple and singular daisy,
She chose to take the bunch of roses.
A sweet melancholy comes to sit beside,
Keeps me warm and cozy inside.

My precious past is anchored deep within,
On my blues and grays, bright red reigns.
There she may be, withered and wise,
But smiles in my paintings with a shy surprise.
———-

Saryu Parikh.  www.saryu.wordpress.com

More

મામા કવિ નાથાલાલ દવે

NOTE:  Send your memoir about Kavi NATHALAL DAVE
namaste.
I am asked to write an article about “My mama, as a kavi.” I have received some kind emails from many.
I request you to spread the word> to write about pujy mama. to saryuparikh@yahoo.com.

Thanks….Saryu 512-712-5170

ભાવનગરની પ્રતિભાઓ: # ૪૩ – નાથાલાલ દવે         લેખીકા: શ્રીમતિ સરયૂ મહેતા-પરીખ

(સપાદિકયનોંધ :  ગુજરાતી  સાહિત્યના ગાંધીયુગ (૧૯૧૫-૧૯૪૫) દરમિયાન અનેક કવિઓ ગાંધીજીની

અસર તળે આવ્યાં અને તેની સીધી અસર તેમના જીવન-કવન પર પડી.તે સમૂદાયમાં ચાર ભાવનગરી કવિજનો  ક્રિષ્નાલાલ શ્રીધરાણી,પ્રેમશંકર ભટ્ટ,પ્રહલાદ પારેખ અને નાથાલાલ દવેનો સમાવેષ થાય.ચારેયનો                                                              જન્મ ૧૯૧૧-૧૯૧૨ના અરસામાં એટલે તે સૌ સમવયસ્ક. આ વર્ષના સપ્ટેંબર માસમાં કવિશ્રીની ૧૦૦મી સંવત્સરી ઉજવાશે.*

નાથાભાઈના કવયિત્રી ભાણી  સરયૂ મહેતા-પરીખ એક કવિજન તેમજ આત્મજન તરીખે કવિશ્રીનું અંહી નીજ જીવન દર્શન રજુ કરે છે
ડો. કનક રાવળ              જુન ૩ ૨૦૧૨

કવિશ્રી નાથાલાલ દવે                                                                                       

જન્મ: જુન 3,૧૯૧૨     મ્રુત્યુઃ  ડિસેંબર, ૧૯૯૩  જન્મ સ્થળઃ    ભુવા
પિતાઃ   વૈદ ભાણજી કાનજી દવે       માતાઃ કસ્તુરબેન     પત્નીઃ નર્મદાબેન

અભ્યાસ: ૧૯૩૪ -બી.એ.; ૧૯૩૬ -એમ.એ.; ૧૯૪૩ – બી. ટી.
વ્યવસાય: શિક્ષણ;  ૧૯૫૬-૧૯૭૦-ગુજરાત રાજ્યના શિક્ષણાધિકારી
નિવૃત્તિ બાદ ભાવનગરમાં મુખ્ય રચનાઓ:
* કવિતા –  કાલિંદી, જાહ્નવી,
અનુરાગ, પિયા બિન, ઉપદ્રવ,
મહેનતનાં ગીત, ભૂદાનયજ્ઞ, સોના
વરણી સીમ, હાલો ભેરૂ ગામડે,
મુખવાસ
* વાર્તા –  ઊડતો માનવી, મીઠી છે જિંદગી,
* સંવાદ પ્રધાન રચનાઓ અને અનુવાદો
૨૦ કાવ્યસંગ્રહો, ૫ વાર્તાસંગ્રહો, ૧૧ સંપાદનો = ૩૬ પુસ્તકો  ૧૯૮૨ સુધીમાં.

“મારા મામા, કવિશ્રી નાથાલાલ દવે.                                        સરયૂ મહેતા-પરીખ.

અમારૂ બાળપણ નાનાજી વૈદ ભાણજી કાનજી અને મામાના વિરભદ્ર અખાડા સામેના ઘરમાં પાંગરેલું. નિર્દોષ ભોળી આંખો પૂજ્ય મામાને અહોભાવથી નિહાળતી. એ સમયે ભાવનગરની બહાર હોવાથી જ્યારે પણ અમારે ત્યાં આવતા ત્યારે ખાસ પ્રેમપૂર્વક મારા બા તૈયારી કરતા હોય એ જોવાનો લ્હાવો હતો. એ સમયે હું આઠેક વર્ષની હતી અને મેં ઊભો સોમવાર કરેલો. મામાને લોકોની સમજ્યા વગર અંધશ્રધ્ધાથી વ્રતો કરવાની રીત સામે સખત અણગમો હતો. મારો હાથ ખેંચીને નીચે બેસાડી દેવાની રમત-રકજકની યાદ આવતા હજી પણ મારા ચહેરા પર હાસ્ય ફરકે છે.
ખાદીના સફેદ વસ્ત્રો, ગોરો વાન અને સુંદર ચહેરાવાળા મારા મામા નવલકથાના નાયક જેવા દેખાતા. ઘણી વખત કવિ સંમેલન, શીબીરમાં કે અમારી શાળામાં કવિતાની સુંદર રજુઆત પછી શ્રોતાગણની પ્રશંશા સાંભળીને મામા માટે ગર્વનો અનુભવ થતો. પાઠ્ય પુસ્તકમાં “પિંજરના પંખીની વાત” એમની સહજ ઓળખાણ માટે પૂરતું હતું. વિનોબાજીની ભાવનગરની મુલાકાત વખતે મામાના લખેલા ગીતો ગવાયેલા અને વિરાણી સ્પર્ધા હોય કે અન્ય કોઈ પ્રસંગ, હું મામાની રચનાઓ, “અષાઢના તારા રે, આભ ભરીને ઊગીયા શા?” કે “આજ આભમાં આનંદ ના સમાય રે, ઢળે રૂપેરી ચાંદની”, ઉમંગ અને સૌને ગમશે એ વિશ્વાસ સાથે ગાતી. મારા પતિ દિલીપના કુટુંબમાં મામા ઘણી વખત કાવ્ય રસ વહેંચતા અને અમે હજી પણ સાથે ગાઈ ઊઠીએ “હવામાં આજ વહે છે ધરતી કેવી ખુશખુશાલી.”
મારા બા, ભાગીરથી, એક બાલિકા બહુ, ચાર ચોપડી પણ પૂરી નહીં કરેલ અને ગામડામાં ગૃહસંસારમાં મુંજાતા હતા ત્યારે તેમના ભાઈ કવિ નાથાલાલ દવે એમને સ્વામિ વિવેકાનંદના પુસ્તકો વાંચવા મોકલતા જે એમને આત્મશ્રધ્ધા અને જાગૃતિના રસ્તે દોરી ગયા અને અઢાર વર્ષની ઉંમરે ફરી ભાવનગરની શાળામાં ભણવાનુ શરૂ કરી કોલેજ સુધી અભ્યાસ કરી, હાઈસ્કુલમાં શિક્ષિકા બન્યા. નાનાજી અને ઘરના લગભગ બધા સભ્યોના વિરોધ સામે ટકી રહેવા એમને અમારા મામાનો સતત સહારો હતો. એક પ્રસંગ બા કહેતા કે એમના ગુરુ શ્રી વજુભાઈ શાહના જન્મદિવસે બધા એકઠાં થવાના હતાં અને મારા નાનાજીએ બાને જવાની મનાઈ કરી, ત્યારે મામાએ સિર્ફ એટલું જ કહેલું, “બહેન જશે, એને જવાનુ છે.” ઘરના વડીલની સામે આ રીતનો વિરોધ કરવો એ પ્રેમાળ ભાઈ જ કરી શકે. આવા અનેક પ્રસંગોએ અમારા મામા હિંમત આપતા અચૂક આવીને ઊભા રહેતા.

એક પ્રસંગે હું હતાશ થયેલી ત્યારે મારા સામે સ્થિર નજર કરી મામાએ કહેલ, “Be brave.”
એ બે શબ્દો મને ઘણી પરિસ્થિતિઓમાં આવીને મનમાં ગુંજતા અને હિંમત આપતા રહ્યા છે.
મામા ક્યારેક બગીચામાંથી ફૂલ લઈ આવી મામીને આપતા કે એમની લગ્નતિથિને દિવસે કંકુની ડબ્બી અને લાલ સાડી આપતા હોય એવી રસિક પળો જોઈ છે. તેમજ મામી બપોરે રસોઈમાંથી પરવારીને આવે ત્યારે મામાએ એમને માટે પાથરણું, ઓશિકું, છાપુ અને ચશ્મા તૈયાર કરીને રાખ્યા હોય કે અરવિંદને વાર્તા કહેતા હોય,  એવી કાળજીની પળો પણ અનેક જોઈ છે.
એ વર્ષ અમારા કુટુંબ માટે મુશ્કેલ હતું જ્યારે નાના જીવનમામા, જે મુંબઈમાં વકિલ હતા, એમનું અને છ મહિના પછી નાથામામાના સૌથી મોટા પુત્ર ગોવિંદભાઈનું અવસાન થયેલ. મામાનું ઋજુ હ્રદય કુમળી ઉંમરમાં ગુમાવેલ મોટી દીકરી શારદાની યાદમાં આળું હતું. પછી બીજી દીકરીનો જન્મ થતાં નામ પ્રિયંમવદા આપેલું, પણ આપણે બધાં એને શારદાના પ્રિય નામથી ઓળખીએ અને યાદ કરીએ છીએ.
ધીરૂભાઈ-પ્રફુલા, નીરૂભાઈ, શારદા, અરવિંદ અને નીપાએ જે રીતે પ્રસન્નતાથી માતા અને નાથામામાની સંભાળ લીધેલી એ કૌટુંબિક સહકારનો અસાધારણ દાખલો છે. પૌત્રી કવિતાએ પણ મામાના જીવનમાં સુખ પાથર્યું છે.
એક સફળ અને સહાનુભૂતિભર્યા કવિહ્રદયની સુવાસ મારા અને મુનિભાઈના અંતરમાં સદાય મીઠી યાદ બનીને રહી છે. અમારા જીવનના ઘડતરમાં અમારા મામાની પ્રેમાળ ઓથને ઈશ્વરકૃપા સમજી આભાર.

મામા-મામી             .. સરયૂનાપ્રણામ  “

*BHAVNAGAR: Family members and citizens of Bhavnagar are celebrating the 100th birth anniversary of noted poet and short story writer late Nathalal Dave, who was born on June 3, 1912 in Bhavnagar. According to his son Nirubhai Dave, there are over 36books to his credit.         Nathalal’s first book of poems ‘Kalindi’ was published in 1942. His creations ‘Jhanvi’, ‘Anurag’, ‘Upadrava’, ‘Mukhva’ and ‘Halve Hathe’ are popular even today. Dave’s ‘Jhanvi’ and ‘Upadrava’ won accolades from state government too.

હવામાં આજ

હવામાં  આજ  વહે  છે  ધરતી  કેરી  ખુશખુશાલી,
મોડી રાતે મેઘ વિખાયો ભાર હૈયાનો કીધો ખાલી-હવા.

ઝાકળબિંદુ પાને પાને તૂર્ણે તૂર્ણે ઝબકે જાણે
રાતે રંગીન નિહારિકા ધરતીખોળે વરસી ચાલી-હવા.

રમતાં વાદળ ગિરિશિખરે મધુર નાની સરિત સરે
દૂર દિગંતે અધિર એનો પ્રીતમ ઊભો વાટ નિહાળી-હવા.

રવિ તો રેલે ન્યારા સોનેરી સૂરની ધારા,
વિશળે ગગનગોખે જાય ગૂંથાતી કિરણ્જાળી-હવા.

મન તો જાણે જુઈની લતા ડોલે, બોલે સુખની કથા,
આજ ઉમંગે નવસુગંધે ઝૂલે એ તો ફૂલીફાલી-હવા.

——    કવિ નાથાલાલ દવે

(નાથાલાલ દવે વિષે વધુ માહિતી કે કાવ્યો માટે મારો સંપર્ક, saryuparikh@yahoo.com પર કોઈ પણ કરી શકે છે.)

જીવન – મૃત્યુ

રૂઠતી  પળોને  સમેટતી  હું   શ્વાસમાં,
દુઃખના દીવામાં સુખવાટ વણી બેઠી છું.
ઘૂઘવતા  સાગરમાં   નાનીશી  નાવમાં,
હળવા  હલેસાંથી  હામ  ધરી  બેઠી  છું.

ઓચિંતા  ભમરાતી   ડમરીની   દોડમાં,
રજકણ  બની  અંક આકાશે  ઊઠી  છું.
અંજળના આંસુથી  આંખોની  આહમાં,
કરુણાનું   કાજળ  લગાવીને  બેઠી   છું.

ઉરના  સન્નાટામાં  લાગણીના  ગીતમાં,
ઝીણા  ઝણકારને  વધાવીને   બેઠી  છું.
નક્કી છે આવશે, પણ ખાલી એ વાયદા,
ક્યારનીયે મુજને  શણગારીને  બેઠી  છું.

સરી  રહ્યો સથવારો  મમતાના  મેળામાં
આજે  અજાણી,  પરાઈ બની  બેઠી  છું.
જીવન  પ્રયાણમાં ને  મંગલ  માહોલમાં,
હંસ જાય ચાલ્યો, પિંજર થઈ  બેઠી  છું.

                 ————      સરયૂ પરીખ

www.saryu.wordpress.com

વસંતના ફૂલ

વસંતના ફૂલ
જુદા જુદા દેશ અને ધર્મવાળી, અનાયાસ મળી ગયેલી, પાંચ બેનપણીઓની કથા.

        અમેરિકાના રહેવાસના ત્રીજા દસકામાં, વ્યવસાયના કારણો અમને હ્યુસ્ટન, ટેક્સાસમાં લઈ આવ્યા હતા. નવી જગ્યામાં સામાજીક પ્રવૃત્તિઓમાં ભાગ લેવાની ઈચ્છા સાથે, પુખ્ત ઉંમરના વિદ્યાર્થીઓને અંગ્રેજી શીખવતી સેવાસંસ્થા સાથે જોડાવાના આશયથી, એમના ટ્રેઈનીંગ ક્લાસમાં ગયેલી. શનીવારે આખ દિવસનો કાર્યક્રમ હતો. હું કોઈને ઓળખતી ન હતી. લંચ સમયે મેલીંગ નામની બહેન મળતાવડી લાગી અને મને એકલી જોઈ બાજુના ટેબલ પર સાથે બેસવા બોલાવી. બધા સાથે પરિચય થયો. રોબીન ખુબ ગોરી, માંજરી આંખોવાળી અને મીઠા સ્મિતવાળી અમેરિકન હતી, જેણે અડતાલીશ વર્ષની ઉંમરે ટીચર બનવાનુ સ્વપ્ન પુરૂ કર્યુ હતુ અને નોકરીની રાહમાં હતી. મેલીંગ નિવૃત્ત થયેલ શિક્ષિકા હતી. જીની કેનેડાની હતી પણ વર્ષોથી અમેરિકામાં એન્જીનીઅર પતિ અને બે દીકરીઓ સાથે વસતી હતી. માર્ગરેટ અનોખી તરી આવે તેવા વ્યક્તિત્વવાળી હતી.
મેં મારૂ શાકાહારી ભોજન શરૂ કરતાં જ એની સુગંધ અને મસાલા વિષે અને ભારતિય ખાણુ ભાવે, વગેરે વાતો થવા માંડી. મેં બટેટા વડા ચાખવા માટે આપ્યા. એ ટેબલ પર અમે જુના ઓળખીતા હોઈએ એવી સહજતાથી વાતોએ વળગ્યા. મેં એમજ હળવાશથી સૂચવ્યું કે આવતા અઠવાડિયે મારે ઘેર લંચ સમયે ભેગા થઈએ! અને મારા આશ્ચર્ય વચ્ચે એ લોકો તૈયાર થઈ ગયા અને અમે એક બીજાના ફોન નંબર વગેરે લઈ લીધા.
આમ સાવ અજાણ્યાની સાથે લંચ કેમ થશે એ બાબત ઉત્કંઠા હતી. દરેક જણ એક વસ્તુ બનાવીને લાવવાના હતા. મને શંકા હતી કે ઓછુ બોલતી જીની આવશે કે નહીં! પણ પહેલી એ જ આવી, ને પછી રોબીન, માર્ગરેટ અને મેલીંગ પણ સમયસર આવી ગયા. વાતોનો દોર બરાબર જામ્યો. માર્ગરેટના પતિ પણ એન્જીનીઅર હતા. માર્ગરેટ ફીજી પાસે ટાસ્મેનીઆ નામના ટાપુ પર ઊછરેલ. મેલીંગ પનામાની હતી અને એના અમેરિકન પતિ ચર્ચના પાદરી હતાં. અમે પાંચે કોલેજ સુધીનો અભ્યાસ કરેલા, સફળ કારકિર્દીવાળા પતિ સાથે અનેક સ્થળોએ રહેલા અને દરેક લગભગ ચાલીશ વર્ષના લગ્નજીવનમાં સુખી બહેનોનો, અણધારી જગ્યાએ, જાણે અનાયાસ મેળ પડી ગયો. છુટા પડતા પહેલા અમે પોતાની ડાયરી કાઢી, આવતા મહિને કોને ત્યાં મળશુ એ નક્કી કરી લીધુ.
પછી તો દર મહિને, મળવાનુ, સાથે સાહિત્ય, કલા અને ફીલોસોફીકલ ચર્ચાઓ તેમજ વ્યક્તિગત વાતો કરવાનો મહાવરો થઈ ગયો. અમે પહેલેથી શું બનાવી લાવવું એ નક્કી ન કરતા તો પણ બધુ વ્યવસ્થિત થઈ પડતુ. મોટો ફેરફાર એ થયો કે ભાગ્યે જ કોઈ અશાકાહારી વસ્તુ ટેબલ પર સામેલ થઈ હોય, જો કે મારા તરફથી કોઈ અણગમો કે આગ્રહ નહોતો. અમારા પાંચે જણાના પતિઓ સાથે સાંજના ખાણા માટે પણ ક્યારેક ભેગા થતાં. આમ વિવિધ સંસ્કારિતાને ચાખવાનો, એમના કુટુંબના સભ્યો સાથે ક્રિસમસ, ઈસ્ટર કે દિવાળી ઉજવવાનો અવસર મળતો.
જે સાવ અશક્ય લાગતી હતી એવી, જીની અને મારી વચ્ચેની મિત્રતા, સમય સાથે દ્રઢ બનતી ગઈ. એમના પતિ છપ્પન વર્ષે નિવૃત્ત થઈ ગયા પણ એનો આનંદ મળે એ પહેલા તો એમને પ્રોસ્ટેટ કેન્સરનુ નિદાન થયું. આ એટલી આઘાતજનક વાત જીની મારી સાથે કરી જીવનમાં આવેલ ઉથલપાથલમાં સમતોલન રાખવા પ્રયત્ન કરતી. અમારી પાંચેની હાજરીમાં એ સમાચાર કહેવાની હિંમત આવતા બે વર્ષ નીકળી ગયા હતા. જીની પાસેથી હું ગુંથતા અને સારૂ શીવણકામ શીખી. પાંચે જણાનુ ભેગા થવાનુ અનિયમિત થતું ગયું પણ હું અને જીની મહિને એકાદ વખત કોઈ પણ આગળથી યોજના બનાવ્યા વગર થોડા કલાકો બહાર નીકળી પડતા. પતિની માંદગીને કારણે, જીની માટે થોડા કલાકો ઘરની બહાર નીકળી જવાનુ જરૂરી બની ગયું હતું.
થોડા દિવસ પહેલા જ જીનીએ લખ્યું કે, “બીમારી સામેની લડત બાર વર્ષ પછી સમાપ્ત થઈ છે. એમનું શાંતિપૂર્વક મૃત્યુ થયું છે.” મારા કહેવાથી થોડા દિવસ મારી સાથે રહેવા હ્યુસ્ટનથી ઓસ્ટીન આવશે.
રોબીનના પિતા ભારતમાં થોડો સમય રહેલા. એમના શીખેલા શબ્દો, “જલ્દી જલ્દી કે, ક્યા દામ હૈ?” એવા પ્રયોગો રસ પૂર્વક કરી એ પોતાના અનુભવો અમારી સાથે વાગોળતા. રોબીન અને એમના પતિને ધાર્મિક અને સેવા કાર્યો સાથે કરવામાં ઘણી મીઠી સંવાદિતા હતી. રોબીન એના ચર્ચમાં બહેનોના ગ્રુપની પ્રમુખ હતી. દર વર્ષે અમે પાંચે બેનપણીઓ એના સમારંભમાં આગળના ટેબલ પર, મુખ્ય મહેમાન સાથે માનથી ગોઠવાતા. એક દિવસ ખાસ યાદ છે…એ સમયે હું વિવિધ કારણોને લઈ ચિંતિત રહેતી. એમા એક વક્તાએ કહ્યું કે, “હું હંમેશા ઈશુની સામે જઈને અમારા ભવિષ્યની “શું યોજના છે?” એવો સવાલ કરતી. પણ મનમાં જાગૃતિ થતાં મેં ભગવાનની પાછળ ચાલી એની યોજના સ્વીકારવાની શરૂ કરી.” આ સામાન્ય વાતની મારા દિલ પર સચોટ અસર થયેલી અને ત્યાર પછી ચિંતા વગર, પ્રમાણિક યત્ન કરવાનો અને જે મળે તેનો સહજ સ્વીકાર કરવાનો, એ મારો જીવનમંત્ર બન્યો.
મેલીંગની જેવી મીઠી જ્હિવા હતી એવું જ વિશાળ દિલ હતું. અમારા દસેક વર્ષના સહવાસમાં મેં એને ક્યારેય કોઈ વ્યક્તિ વિષે અણગમો બતાવતા નથી સાંભળી. એમના પતિ જે ચર્ચમાં પાદરી હતા તે જ ચર્ચમાં મેલીંગ મોટી સંખ્યામાં મોટી ઉંમરના બહેનો અને ભાઈઓને અંગ્રેજી ભણાવવાનું સેવા કાર્ય કરતી. પોતાના માત-પિતા અને કુટુંબને અનન્ય સન્માન અને સ્નેહથી સિંચતી જોવી એ લ્હાવો હતો. એના યુવાન પુત્રને રમતા થયેલ ઈજા વખતે અમે બધા એની સાથે પ્રાર્થનામાં જોડાયા અને મહિનાઓ સુધી એના મનોબળનો આધાર બની રહ્યા. હજી સુધી મારા જન્મદિવસે હું સામેથી એની શુભેચ્છા મેળવવા ફોન કરૂં છું.
માર્ગરેટ તાસ્મેનિઆથી દુનિયાના આ બીજે છેડે આવીને વસી હતી પણ એનું દિલ તો એની પ્યારી જન્મભૂમિમાં જ રહેતુ. એના પતિ ઘણીં સારી નોકરી કરતા હતા તેથી એમના મોટા બંગલામાં ઘણી વખત બપોરના જમણ માટે અને કેટલીક સાંજ અમારા પતિ સાથે ઘણી વૈભવશાળી બની રહેતી. માર્ગરેટ એના ચર્ચમાં પ્રાર્થના મંડળમાં નિયમિત ગાતી અને ઘેર કલાત્મક ભરતકામ કરતી.
મને સાહિત્યમાં રસ તેથી હું એનો રસાસ્વાદ કરાવતી રહેતી. અમે ભગવત ગીતા, ઓશો અને બીજા હિંદુ ગ્રંથો સાથે બાઈબલ અને કુરાન વિષે પણ રસપૂર્વક ચર્ચા કરતાં. એક માનવધર્મમાં શ્રધ્ધા હોવાનું વિશ્વાસ સાથે કહેનાર માટે કસોટીનો સમય આવેલ જ્યારે અમારી દીકરીએ બાંગલાદેશી મુસ્લીમ સાથે લગ્ન કરવાની સંમતિ માંગી. પરિચય અને સહજ સ્વિકારથી મીઠા સંબંધો શક્ય બન્યા.
વ્યક્તિનુ મૂલ્ય અમારે મન વધારે મહત્વનુ બની રહ્યુ એ વાત સાબિત થઈ શકી.
મારા સ્વભાવ અનુસાર બધાને સ્નેહતંતુથી બાંધી રાખવાની જવાબદારી મેં સહજ રીતે અપનાવી લીધેલી. એ વર્ષે મારી બીજી વસંત ૠતુ ટેક્સાસમાં હતી. કુદરતના ખોળે રંગીન ફૂલો છવાયેલા હતા. એની પુરબહાર મૌલિકતા મ્હાણવા અમે એક દિવસ વહેલી સવારે નીકળી ગયા. જીનીમાં
ક્યાં અને કઈ રીતે જવાની આગવી સમજને કારણે મોટે ભાગે એ જ કાર ચલાવતી. બ્લુ બોનેટ્સ મધ્યમા અને ચારે તરફ સફેદ, લાલ અને પીળા રંગના સાથીયા જોઈને દિલ તરબતર થઈ ગયું. બપોરના સમયે જમણ માટે એક ઘરમાં દાખલ થયાં. રસોઈબેઠકમાં લાંબા બાંકડાઓ ગોઠવેલા હતાં, જ્યાં ટેક્સાસના કહેવાય છે એવા બે ‘કાવબોય’ બેઠેલા. એમની પાસે અમે પાંચે સામસામા ગોઠવાયા. એ અજાણ્યા ભાઈઓ સાથે મેલીંગ અને રોબીન મીઠાશથી વાતો કરવા લાગ્યા. અમે પાંચે સેવાભાવથી કામ કરતી સંસ્થામાં જોડાયેલા હતા અને એ રીતે મિત્રો બન્યા છીએ, એ વાત પણ નીકળી. જૂની ઓળખાણ હોય એમ વાતો ચાલી. જમવાનુ આવ્યુ અને પછી ચેરીપાઈ પણ મંગાવવાની વાત અમે કરી રહ્યા હતા.
બન્ને ભાઈઓનુ જમણ પુરુ થતા પ્રેમપૂર્વક ટેક્સન સ્ટાઈલથી આવજો કરીને બહાર બીલ આપવા ઉભેલા જોયા અને પછી દૂરથી સલામ કરી જતા રહ્યા.
થોડી વારમાં વેઈટ્રેસ બહેન આવીને પુછે કે, “ગળ્યામાં કઈ પાઈ તમારે લેવાની છે?”
અમને નવાઈ લાગી, “તમને કેવી રીતે ખબર કે અમારે પાઈ જોઈએ?”
“પેલા બે સજ્જનો તમારૂ, પાઈ સહિત, પુરૂ બીલ ભરીને ગયા છે.” વાહ! અમને ટેક્સન મહેમાનગતીનો અવનવો અનુભવ થયો. અમારા ધન્યવાદની પણ અપેક્ષા રાખ્યા વગર એ બન્ને ચાલ્યા ગયા.
સદભાવનાની સુવાસ જાણ્યે અજાણ્યે દિલથી દિલને સ્પર્શી પ્રસરતી રહેતી, આમ અનેક પ્રસંગે અનુભવી છે. અમેરિકા આવી ત્યારે કોઈક લોકો એવું કહેતા કે તમને આ પરદેશીઓ સાથે મિત્રાચારી થાય પણ મિત્રતા નહીં. મારા અનુભવમાં એવું વિધાન પાયા વગરનું સાબિત થયું છે. અમુક મિત્રો સાથે છેલ્લા પાંત્રિસેક વર્ષોથી ગહેરી દોસ્તી રહી છે. એક વાત યાદ આવે છે કે એક આગંતુક ગામના મુખિયાને પુછે છે, “આ ગામમાં કેવા લોકો છે?” મુખી પુછે, “ભાઈ, તું આવ્યો એ ગામમાં કેવા લોકો હતાં?”

        વસંતના ફૂલોના વિવિધ રંગો આ ધરતીને,
તેમજ મિત્રતાની સંવાદિતામાં હસતાં ચહેરાઓ જીવનને,
વૈભવશાળી બનાવે છે.
———  

——————-

The Wild Flowers of Spring                             Saryu Parikh

Five different races, religions, and cultures, and a story of our friendship.
We had moved to Houston, Texas not too long before when I joined a volunteer group to teach English. We had a day-long workshop, and I was sharing a desk with a lady named Mei Ling. At the lunch break, when she saw me sitting alone, she called me to sit with her group. At her table was an American lady, Robin, who welcomed me with a friendly smile. There was a Canadian lady, Ginny, who gave me a guarded but polite smile. Tall and talkative Margaret was from Tasmania, an island near Australia.  Mei Ling had Chinese heritage but was born and raised in Panama.
I have been in the USA for the last forty years but with my long hair, ethnic outfit, with a bindi on my forehead, no one had confusion about my heritage. I do wear all kinds of clothes without being self-conscious, but I always felt privileged to wear a sari or salwar-kamiz  at any gathering. I have been so comfortable with who I am, it has been easy to strike up interesting conversation with any person of any nationality.
I started my lunch and the ladies around said, “Oh! That spicy fragrance, I love Indian food,” echoed. I let them taste some food. Inquiries about each other uncovered that we all were married to professional men for many years and had lived in the many corners of the world. At this stage of our lives, when children are grown and moved out and had no need to work for the money, we all had gathered here to do some volunteer work. Wow! Interesting!  At the end of the hour, I casually suggested we meet at my house for lunch the following week. They all agreed to come and bring a covered dish.
I was skeptical about who would come, how the time would pass, etc. I was doubtful that the Canadian lady, Ginny, would come, but it turned out that she was the first to arrive. And then the other ladies showed up. The conversation and food blended very easily. After that, our monthly get- together continued at different homes or Indian restaurants with in-between visits to temples, churches, and art stores. One nice aspect was that, even without my request, our meals were vegetarian most of the time. We shared our knowledge and experiences with great interest. Each person’s life was a unique story.
Robin was in her late forties when she secured her teaching certificate.  She was happy and a proud mother of three and a grandmother of seven. She and her husband were very involved in church activities. That was the one couple I met who was living their lives as Christians in a real sense. They used to travel to foreign countries to do charity work. Robin was the president of the women’s ministry of her church. Every year, it was a great privilege for our group to sit at the main table with Robin and the invited speaker. Her father was in India in war time and had taught Robin some Hindi words like, “jaldi, jaldi” (“hurry hurry”) and “kitaneka hai?” (“What’s the price?”). We spent quite a few holidays with her family. Robin was an avid reader of the books. She gifted me a volume of the Bible, which I treasure. I used to share philosophical Hindu books with her. The great thing to share with Robin was her jovial laugh.
Margaret had come from a small place called Tasmania and her Australian accent with her deep voice sounded poetic. She would say, “You can take Margaret out of Tasmania but you cannot take Tasmania out of her”.  She was very talkative, and if I would not interrupt her, she would tell very long stories of simple daily routines. She was a sophisticated and talented lady. Her husband had to travel so she had to occupy herself in social clubbing and church singing. We all enjoyed dinner parties at her sumptuous home. She soon lost her beloved husband after a short period of illness. She moved to be near her children, and unexpectedly ended up near Robin, who had shifted to the West coast after retirement. The great thing I shared with Margaret was her worldly knowledge.
Mei Ling, a peaceful and pleasant soul, was a very compassionate person. She was born and raised in Panama. She had come to America for her education. She fell in love and made her home in the USA. Her husband was a pastor in the Baptist church, and Mei Ling was devoted to her church. As a retired teacher, she was managing large adult classes and was recognized as a top volunteer by our organization. At our luncheons, we used to hold hands and she used to say prayers, and at the dinner table, her husband. One time her son had a very serious injury and she called me in that difficult time. The emotional support for her family and friends was tremendous, and fortunately their son recovered completely. Every year I would like to receive good wishes from Mei Ling on my birthday. The great thing to share with Mei Ling was her wisdom.
Ginny was a person who talked less and did a lot more for me and everyone else around her. She became my guide in knitting, sewing, shopping and in traveling around Houston. Within a few weeks of our introduction, we started to go out without much planning, just to do something creative. Her husband and mine were engineers and we recognized some striking similarities in their behaviors. That was so much fun for us to talk about because we knew exactly what the other one was talking about. We would whine and complain about someone and then burst out laughing, saying, “We are perfect!”  When very serious illness struck her loved one, I was her confidant and supporter. It took her two years to verbalize it with the rest of the group. She devoted herself to the struggle against the sickness, which extended to twelve years. The great things I shared with Ginny were unplanned outings and the quiet time together.
After coming from India in 1969, we lived in New Jersey, Southern California, Florida, and finally Texas. As a volunteer I was involved in many lives. My religion gives me peace of mind and to achieve that, unconditional acceptance and respect for all human beings are necessary.  My magnanimous talk came to the test when our daughter chose to marry a Bangladeshi Muslim young man. We valued a good human being with open minded attitude which brought sweet harmony in our relations.

It was spring time and the wild flowers were in full bloom all around. That was my second season in Texas.  We all decided to take a sightseeing trip to the countryside with the navigation leadership of Gene. The beautiful Blue Bonnets with circles of red, yellow and white flowers had spread a colorful carpet as far as we could see.  At lunch time we stopped at a homey Inn for lunch. There were three long bench-style tables and customers would sit anywhere, like family members.  We joined two cowboys eating their meal. Mei-ling and Robin and rest of us started friendly conversation with those two gentlemen. We ordered food and were telling each other to order the pies later. When they asked how we (such a different-looking bunch) became friends, Robin told them about our common link of volunteer work. The pleasant chit-chat ended with a kind good-bye as they left, waving their hands in salute as they walked away.
In a short while the waitress came and asked, “What kind of pie do you want?”
We asked, “How do you know we are going to order pie?”
The waitress said, “Those two cowboys paid your bill, including the pies.” We five friends were surprised. We were impressed by the Texan hospitality. Wow!
When I was new in this country, I had heard our Indian friends saying, “You will find friendly relations among these people but you will not find friends.” My experience has been different. Some tender loving friendships with women from a variety of backgrounds have been alive after more than thirty-five years in different corners of this country. My new friends came into my life unexpectedly like wild flowers and added some more colors to make my life richer.————
You never know a smile on your lips
May grace the hope in some one’s heart.
You never know when you share your joy,
May help someone to find a song.
You never know a touch of your hand
May spread some wings to seek solace.

——

 

Her Dry Tears

Her Dry Tears-a true story

While living in Houston, I was invited to be a Board member for a volunteer domestic violence organization.   That week I was monitoring calls.  In the middle of the afternoon, I got a call from a far-away state. The lady said she had a niece named Reema in India whose five-year-old daughter and husband were living in the Houston area. Two years prior, they had all gone to India for a short visit, and Reema was tricked into staying in India while her in-laws brought her child back to the U.S.  She was left without her passport so she could not re-enter the U.S.

The situation seemed beyond the capacity of our small nonprofit organization. Reema’s aunt kept on calling me, saying that we were her last hope. By that time, Reema had secured her passport and she was ready to come to Houston.  I presented her case to the Board and we accepted her as our client.  As a volunteer this was such a new experience for me.

Reema came to Houston with her aunt, Monabua, and I went to see them. Reema was quiet, somewhat dull.  She was 32-years-old and had education as a pharmacist in India. I became very hopeful with the idea that we could help her to get her license as a pharmacist to work in the U.S. They both did not share my enthusiasm.  I was unsure as to why at the time. Monabua arranged a meeting with Reema’s husband.  They all sat down together for all of ten minutes.  It was very clear that he wanted a divorce and she wanted to see her child.  Monabua hired a lawyer before she went back to her home state.

Reema was left in my care.  I managed to get her a place in the Women’s shelter. I started hearing about her inability to follow simple rules. I would get calls from her from all over town saying she missed her ride. I felt sorry for her for getting into these troubles because of her lack of attention.  I got her all the necessary materials to study for her pharmacy exam, but I never saw her open a single book.  She had some excuse every time.  After two weeks I talked to a manager in a chain store, and out of her kindness she gave Reema a job.  The next step was to find her an apartment, for which our organization would initially pay the rent. Fortunately, I saw an advertisement for a room to rent in the house of a divorced young mother with a baby. Meanwhile, I tried to talk to Reema’s husband, but he would only politely give me his lawyer’s number.

She did not have transportation, so my duty was to drive her around. Her attitude and lack of efficiency were frustrating. On the first day of work my husband Dilip and I both went to pick her up early in the morning but she had overslept.  But we were glad that now she had a job. I thought that she should have a car. In my neighborhood, I spotted a car for sale, and the owners were kind enough to reduce the price. I proposed to the Board that we loan her the money which she may pay back. There was disagreement about this unprecedented help to the victim. After a lot of discussion, Reema got that money. I got used to the phone ringing early in the morning with questions like, “Where are my car keys?”  I would tell her to look in her heavily-loaded purse again. One night at ten o’clock she called after work saying, “My car does not start.” After some questions I asked her to check the gear, which had been in Drive.

She was depressed most of the time, so I got her a psychiatrist to help her. Depression is a vicious cycle of cause and effect. I felt compassion for all parties involved. Her actions made me realize that how important it is to have a functional brain, common sense, and intelligence to get us through difficult situations.

By court order, the day of meeting with her daughter had arrived. She dressed up nicely and took some toys with her. The meeting place, a mall, was one hour away and this was the first time I was to meet her husband. To be safe, Dilip drove us there.

The little girl was not ready to let go of her father’s hand. She was gently forced to sit near her mother while the father sat nearby so she could see him. The child had to spend one hour with her mother. She was in tears and all she talked about was her dad. Reema took her around for a little walk and when they came back, the child was all smiles at seeing her father. Reema later told us that it was the only time she saw her smile. In following visits she remained distant from Reema.

Reema was managing her life with lots of help from us. After about six months, the court decision was to give custody of the child to her father with visiting options for Reema. She got some money, but she had to pay child support. She had lived in Houston as a married woman for two years but no one came forward to say that she was a capable mother. She told me often that no one cared for her except me.

She was then let go from her job. She moved back to the shelter. On moving day I had told her to pack her things so I could help her to load at three o’clock. When I arrived, she was running in circles, doing many things and accomplishing very little. We loaded things as they were and I told her that at the shelter she would have plenty of time to sort things out. I talked to her aunt and we both felt that she had to live with some family members.  She just wasn’t able to function on her own. She did not want to go back to live with her widowed mother in India.

Reema ended up moving to her aunt’s home hundreds of miles away.  She left some important papers in her car, which she had parked at our home. When I opened the car door, I found it was full of junk. So day by day I had to empty the car to prepare it for sale. The car was sold, and to be kind to her I gave her the money. She had been oblivious to the fact that it was the organization that had bought her the car!  After my explanation, she thanked the organization properly.

She had to come for the scheduled meetings to visit her child, but the trips were too expensive for her. I suggested that she go back to India and be someone of whom a daughter could be proud.  After a year or so, I received a phone call. “Saryu!  I miss you. I am going to India.
I don’t know what will be next! Thank you very much for giving me a chance to see my child again.”

She was a victim of her own attitude and in turn she became victim of her own people. Her emotions were still behind her dry tears. An organization can help but the success of a survivor depends upon her own instinct and intelligence.
——–


Depression-Cause and Effect

In the dark corner with ghosts
I paid a heavy depression cost;
God gave me a sweet angel
and her to you, I simply lost.

Some kind people do care,
But relation is a two-way affair;
I feel barren, dull within,
Have nothing much to share.

They say my tasks are all undone,
But I have been busy, overwhelmed;
I saw good fortune dance away
Leaned on someone else’s sway.

My life is thick layers of cloud
I fall and fall, no one  to hold;
I hope and pray a spark in night
May ignite dim internal light.

———-

Abashed Moon. ઝંખવાયેલો ચાંદ.

Kamal–a true story

I was on my way to meet Kamaljit kaur at the County Women’s Shelter to listen and to teach English. Kamal met me at the door wearing a simple outfit, Salwaar-kamiz. My first thought was, “Oh! She looks like a film star and playing a sad role in this grim place.” We were told to sit in the computer room. She was ready with paper and pen. I know Hindi, which is a National language of India. But Kamal informed me that she knew Punjabi and a little Hindi. So, in the circle of three languages our sailing started. More

Hug Him…..

Hug Him….

A teenage son does not need to go too far to declare his double-dare policy.  Just his father’s presence is sufficient.  As usual, his dad and I took him for school clothes shopping. He was leading us through the maze of racks of weird clothes. Whenever we made a suggestion, he did not even bother to shake his head in response. Finally, he picked out a pair of pink shorts with flowers on it and some similar outfits. I was just smiling at his choices, but his father was in shock. He went on expressing his opinion as strongly as he could but finally shook his head and walked out of the shop.

On our way home, his father said, “How could you select such strange clothes and pay so much money?” The lecture did not seem to reach its intended target, so he told me, “From now on I will not take him shopping – you handle it.”

If not every day, but every week for sure, there were one or two disagreements between father and son.
“Why do you have to buy ninety-dollar shoes when I am wearing these perfectly fine shoes for fifteen dollars?” Dad would ask.  A good teenager’s law: you do not have to respond to any question.

When he went to his Dad for financial advice, there was sweet harmony. He trusted his father’s judgment to secure his financial future in his middle and high school era. He came up with an idea and requested his father to invest in Nike’s stocks for him. The profit from that investment made the rest of his teenage years a breeze.

He announced at the dinner table one evening, “I am going to buy tickets for upcoming NBA basketball games.”  We were aware of his loyal craze for the Lakers and basketball.

“How much do they cost?”

“Oh! I will buy them with my money.”

“How much?”

“Maybe eight hundred bucks.”

“You have only a thousand dollars. Get ready to work after school.”

 

 

That explanation sent him looking for some free tickets. He went to see a game with a friend and his father. After the game, he somehow sneaked back into the stadium because he was determined to see his favorite team. But his ride was gone when he came out. It was close to eleven o’clock. He was smart enough to go to the guard and called home. He said, “I cannot find my friend. Please, come and get me.” His father was benevolent until he heard about the cause of his detour.

He was very generous about giving gifts, especially to his sister. He surprised her with a Boom box on her sixteenth birthday. With a belief in quality, his selections were always at high-end prices. We used to tease him that in the store the expensive things wave at him, “Come and buy me!” Many times this teenager thought that the world had started with him, and that attitude was enough to annoy his father. An argument, followed by a few days of the cold shoulder, would remind him that he is not as smart as he thinks. Then a small piece of paper with a few apologetic lines on it would exchange hands and father would treasure that small piece of paper forever.

He convinced his father to buy the car of his choice with all the trimmings. His father always reminded him, “On Father’s Day, I had to buy this car for my son.”

One night, the teenager, his sister, and her friend had gone out for dinner.  Around ten o’clock we got a call. Our daughter said, “On our way home, brother was driving. There has been a horrible accident. We are okay, but my friend is seriously injured and I am with her at the hospital. He is at a near-by gas station, finishing up with the police.” We both hurriedly went to the location of the accident. The car was towed away and everything was quiet. He was standing near the door of the store all alone. I was sitting in the passenger seat. I was not in tune with his lonely feelings and expected him to come and sit in the car.

From the driver’s seat, his father was looking at him with moist eyes and I heard his warm voice tell me, “Go and give him a hug.”

The depth of this love connection is immeasurable.

Youth is a beautiful time, and it spirals between three facets of a teen’s life: Love, Rebellion and Freedom.  In this relationship, I saw love prevail every time.

 

——————————

Smile Again…Saryu Parikh હસી ફરી

Smile Again

I saw her in the early evening light, waiting at the corner store. Her head was covered with the head band, or hijab.  I pulled up in my car, and we greeted each other as she opened the passenger door and got in. She seemed nervous as I was driving her to the Literacy Council’s location. Even though she had an engineering degree from her country, she spoke in broken English. Selma thanked me with a guarded smile for picking her up.

For the past one year her life had been in turmoil. I could see the sadness on her pretty face. I started teaching her English, and at the same time she gained confidence and trust. As a domestic violence victims’ advocate, I knew about her plight but she wanted to tell her story in her own words:

“My wonderful Teacher! The mountains of Syria seem so far away. The little girl who was called princess by her parents – sounds like it was in another lifetime. I was in high school when Shabir started paying special attention to me. Shabir was my first cousin but due to a family feud we kept away from each other. Our attraction blossomed in college. He became a dentist and I became an Engineer. When we announced our intention of getting married, our fathers gave in and both brothers’ families resumed their relations. Everything was like a dream.

After Shabir possessed me, his next obsession was to go to America. My opinion did not matter. He got his H1 visa and we came to Texas. My life was limited in the tiny apartment. I looked and felt out of place. Due to my visa status I could not get a job. Shabir, without a state license in dentistry, was working with very low pay. He used to come home frustrated and would find any reason to beat me.

In time, someone gave him the idea that if he married a U.S. citizen, his life would be so much easier. Then that obsession took over his thinking. I started wondering when he stayed out longer hours. Whenever I asked any question he raised his hand and told me to shut up. Then he started mumbling about divorce and shipping me back home. That would deeply hurt my family’s reputation in our community. Here I had casually met one or two families where Muslim traditions were followed religiously. I would not dare to share my domestic troubles with them. I was taught that a good woman always obeys her husband and serves him pleasantly.  Shabir would not tolerate any objections from me.

That day he was determined to get hold of my passport. He yelled and slapped me and ordered to hand over the passport. He threatened me with a knife. I ran into the bedroom, shut the door and dialed 911. Briefly I explained what was going on and left the phone on. He was quiet for a while so I opened the door and ran outside of my apartment. He came after me and started to drag me along the side-walk and up the steps. He heard the police car and let go of me. He approached the police as if nothing was going on but they could see the fear in my eyes and bruises on my body. They asked him to go and sit in the police car. While he was passing by me, he told me in my language, “I will find you and kill you.”

I was taken to the police station. After all this, I was afraid for my life and would not dare go back to our apartment. I was given a few pamphlets of different organizations and shelters. My English was very weak and I was so nervous that my speech was not understandable. One voice, speaking in Arabic, replied the next day. That lady was a volunteer, willing to help me. My day began with talking to the strangers and sharing my very personal life. Although, I was in an unknown place and among unknown people, I felt safe. Their confidence helped me to feel that I had some right to be happy too.

I went to many different offices and met many people. I was pleasantly surprised to see total strangers actually believing in me, ready to help me! I never wanted to face Shabir. I was afraid of him and at the same time I despised him. I was only 31 years old and he had destroyed my life. The court forced him to pay me a small amount monthly, and divorce proceedings were slow to progress due to many complicated issues. The future seemed dubious. Fortunately, my advocate found a middle eastern family who needed a housekeeper.”

Selma’s host family lived in my neighborhood but she preferred that I pick her up and drop her off at the corner drug store. She got a special visa available for domestic violence victims, so she could stay here and work.  She did not want anyone finding out where she was staying. She kept in touch with her family and a few of us by cell phone. She maintained good relations with her host family and lived with them for more than one year until she moved into her own apartment.

I always felt that if she kept her traditional look wearing a hijab, it might be difficult to find a job. I also believe that it is a good idea to assimilate with the society in which you live, but without compromising our principles. Covering one’s head had its purpose under certain circumstances. I brought up that point but she was determined to keep her traditional look. She always had to adjust her activities with her prayer times. She felt at peace praying five times a day, and it showed in her behavior.

After her divorce finalized, Selma started receiving marriage proposals. She shared the information with me, and I helped her to prepare before each “date.” One businessman from her country was very nice to her. He was divorced with three children. She met with his family during Ramadan and felt comfortable. She told him that she needs several months to decide and definitely not before her family’s approval. They put aside the marriage plans and worked out a deal that she would work in one of his stores as a salesperson. Our organization helped her to rent and furnish one apartment near the shopping mall where she worked. It was a children’s clothing store.

After several months I received a letter which said: “My wonderful teacher! You will be glad to know that my life is getting better. I will be getting married soon. My new husband went to my home town and got blessings from my family. I have survived!”

My mind vividly remembered one evening with Selma after a long English session.  We had a good heart-to-heart talk as we walked out from the classroom. The wild flowers and tall pleasant yellow sunflowers were looking at us. I admired that sight. Selma started up the hill and through the weeds to collect those lovely sunflowers. She brought down a bunch and ceremoniously presented them to me. That beautiful evening and her gentle smile left a special picture in my heart.

I wrote her back. “Those sunflowers are now growing in my garden and every time I look at them, they remind me of you. Now you know, growing untended in the wild, the pretty sunflowers can survive and thrive, and so have you. I wish you courage, wisdom, and joy in your life.”
Love,
your teacher, Saryu.

Smile Again
My wonderful teacher, I send you this letter
To let you know that my life is much better.
As you know, I grew up in Syria
School and college were sheltered euphoria.
He was cute and pursued me for long;
I married him for love, thought together we belonged
I was overjoyed to come, guided by his ruling hand
I was happy in the hijab, timorous in this foreign land

Soon, my love was quite aloof; he had seen the dollar spoof
I was hurt and all alone, didn’t know what was going on!
He often slapped me here and there; I thought,“ he is just upset!”
I didn’t have anyone to tell, I kept the secrets very well.
He humiliated me more, asked for papers and passport,
I said, “ No, no, you must leave.” He said, “ need you to deport.”
He waved the shiny knife, yelled and dragged me to the street.
I cried and begged him just to stop, couldn’t see a way to retreat.

The police took me to a bend, where I could barely comprehend.
They told me to call some shelter, a safe place;
“I want to see my mama’s gentle face.”

Lucky for me that you were there.
You kindly took me in your care.
You tended my broken, beaten life,
You stroked my tender, weeping heart.

You taught me how to get my rights
Find the freedom from the fights
I look forward to future sights
Out of the dark and into the lights.

I thank you, O’ my teacher, as well as several other kind helping hands.
Your Happy Survivor 
—————————- ——————-
True story/Written by Saryu Parikh, June 2009

૧૨. હસી ફરી…સરયૂ પરીખ

સંધ્યાના આછા અજવાળામાં મેં તેને દુકાનના નાના મકાન પાસે ઊભેલી જોઈ. એનો માસુમ ચહેરો સફેદ હિજાબમાં લગભગ  ઢંકાયેલો હતો. મેં કાર રોકી.

More

A White Dress With Red Flowers

A white dress with red flowers

A White Dress with Red Flowers                       Saryu Parikh

In my beloved city Bhavnagar, on my parents’ teaching salaries, we lived comfortably, even if it was month-to-month living. As a middle-class family, we had our own bungalow with a good-sized garden and more than ten mango trees. I was in charge of taking care of the rose bushes. I had a few dresses, which I used to fold carefully and arrange on one shelf in a cabinet. We had not experienced much luxury in our lives, so what you did not have, you did not miss having.

When I was a child, I had gotten sick with Typhoid fever and after that, for some unknown reason, I had become a chubby little teenager. My cousins used to tease me, saying, “Double Typhoid, if you worry, you will lose weight.” And I used to ask, “Tell me how to worry.”

My father did most of the shopping for our household, but for my clothes I always went with my mom. I used to wait for the Saturdays when my mother had half day of school. On shopping day, I would be ready early and with all the silent body language I could muster I would encourage my mom to hurry. Right after lunch I would have her pillow and blanket ready for a short afternoon nap. It would work okay except …. the fear of arrival of some unexpected guests and any delay because of them was very traumatic for me. In nineteen sixties we did not have telephones, so guests drop by any time and no one would dare to turn them away saying…”we have to go.” I would rush to offer them tea and quickly prepare it and serve the guests. After that, I would stand near
the door to express my urgency without being rude.

That special Saturday we went to our newly-found favorite fabric store. The men started showing us various fabrics for my dresses. That special attention to this thirteen-year-old girl was sweet like honey. One man brought out a roll of fabric from the far corner. As soon as he unrolled this soft, white georgette with tiny red flowers, I was sold. The measuring tape came to the end, showing some damaged material.

My mom said, “We cannot buy this fabric.” My eyes were glued to the fabric.
The tears shined in my eyes. My mom gave in let me have the fabric. The dress was made from that smooth material and I was allowed to wear it only on special occasions. I was quite pleased just folding and unfolding that white dress with red flowers

One day I was feeling sick, so I went to my uncle’s small medical clinic. He did not clearly explain to me that pneumonia is a serious thing to have. We walked back home and my mom went to work. I was in pain that whole afternoon. When my mom came home from school and saw my face, she felt very guilty for going to work. I barely remember the next four days as my mom was hovering around my bed and my father
had a worried look on his face. In the middle of the night they were rubbing medicine on my side so I could breathe. My brother was going in and out of my room trying to find ways to cheer me up. The added nervousness was due to the reason… after two days of fever, we had lost my five-year-old sister three years ago. That heart-wrenching experience was yet very loud around us.
On the fifth day I was a little better. I was to get a sponge bath. I was lazily looking around, and I ended up staring at the white dress with red flowers in the cabinet. My mother followed my stare and smiled. Right after my sponge bath, she brought
out that dress and helped me to wear it. As my brother walked in, he saw the grin on my face and started to tease me, and I giggled for the first time in days.

As my awareness returned, the first thing I remember was that my hand and fingers seemed thinner. Just then I realized that I had lost significant weight. Wow! My dream came true.

During more than two weeks of recovery many friends came to visit me. I had a very loyal friend name Hansa. She had so much affection for me that I used to take her for granted and for any small thing I used to pick a fight and stop talking to her.
My mother used to tell me, “Saryu! If you do not value the love coming your way, you will stop receiving it.” With three other friends she came to see me. I responded with a gracious welcome, and after that I learned to appreciate her generous interactions with me.

I was feeling good enough to go out and check on my roses. A beautiful pink rose was smiling at me. I plucked it to take inside the house. I saw my mother sitting at her desk working on her poem. I presented that rose to her. Her smile expressed her relief knowing that I was healthy again. After a few hours I never saw that rose and forgot all about it. I resumed my activities as a slimmer, prettier teenager.

The white dress with red flowers always remained my favorite even after I had outgrown it.

Years went by. After marriage, we settled in America. I went back several times to India but did not go to my home-town Bhavnagar for many years. In 1993, Mom passed away in Vadodara. Afterward, I went back to our old house, the home I had left twenty-four years before, leaving a void in the lives of my loved ones. I was feeling raw emotions in the deepest corner of my heart. When I opened my mother’s cupboard, I saw my white dress with the red, tiny flowers and her book next to it. I gently opened my mom’s poetry book and out came the pink rose carefully arranged between the pages. I was overwhelmed with emotions as if the little girl was looking out from the secret window of my heart!

I looked with my tear-filled eyes as somebody entered the room.
Our maid-helper of many years had come with her granddaughter. She told me that she had seen my mother touch this dress tenderly with a gentle smile on her face when she used to miss me most. I held that dress close to me for a few minutes and handed it to the little girl. A joyous smile brightened her face and she left with her grandmother, giggling.

I took the book with the pink rose and sat there, enveloped in the arms of the warm memories.  
Essence of Eve
Dew of dawn on the whisper of verse,
Riding from moment to moment,
Merge and melt in the essence of eve.

Awake to rejoice at the light of the sun,
And the wonderful verve of life and love.

Awareness makes me forget the past,
And kindles fiercely the hope in my heart.

The peaceful rhymes of poetic life,
The imperial glory and boundless flight!

I write my lines in the simmering sand,
The ocean of emotions exalting the land.
——–
Saryu Parikh

લાલ ફૂલો વાળો સફેદ ડ્રેસ

મારા પ્યારા ભાવનગરમાં, મારા માતા-પિતાની શિક્ષકની નોકરીની આવકમાં, અમારા નાના કુટુંબની જરુરિયાતો સંચવાઈ જતી. એક મધ્યમ વર્ગના સભ્યો તરીકે, અમારૂ પોતાનુ ઘર હતુ, બગીચામાં દસેક આંબા હતાં.  જોકે કેવળ ગુલાબના છોડની સંભાળ રાખવાની મારી જવાબદારી હતી. મારી પાસે આંગળીને ટેરવે ગણી શકુ એટલા કપડાં હતાં. કબાટમાં, કાચના બારણા પાછળ, સંકેલીને એક ખાનામાં ગોઠવાઈને મારા કપડા મુકાયેલા રહેતાં. અમને જીવનમાં જીવન જરૂરિયાત કરતા વધારે એશો આરામનો અનુભવ નહોતો તેથી અદ્યતન સગવડતાઓની કમી છે, એવી સમજ નહોતી પડતી.

મને આંઠ-નવ વર્ષની ઉંમરે ટાઇફૉઇડ થયો અને ત્યાર પછી કોઈ અજાણ કારણથી હું જાડી થઈ ગઈ હતી. મને ચિડવવા ‘ડબલ ટાઈફોડ’ નામ પણ આપેલુ.
પાછા ઉપરથી સલાહ આપનાર કહેતા, “તું ચિંતા કરે તો પાતળી થઈ જાય.”
તો હું ભોળા ભાવે પૂછતી, “મને કહો, ચિંતા કેમ થાય?” 

ઘરની લગભગ બધી ખરીદી મારા બાપુજી કરતા, પણ મારા કપડા ખરીદવા મારે બાની સાથે જવાનુ થતું. શનિવારે બાને સવારની અરધા દિવસની શાળા ચાલુ હોય તેથી બપોરે જવાનુ શક્ય બનતુ. ખરીદી કરવા જવાના દિવસે મારા ઉત્સાહને કાબુમાં રાખવાનુ અઘરું કામ હતુ. બપોરનુ જમવાનુ પુરૂ થતાં બા જલ્દી આરામ કરી લે તે વાસ્તે શેત્રંજી અને ઓશીકું ગોઠવીને તૈયાર કરીને મુકી દેતી. પછી ચા પણ બનાવી આપુ. પણ સૌથી મોટો ભય અતિથિ આવીને ઉભા રહેશે એનો રહેતો. અને એવું બને ત્યારે મારા મનનાં અણગમાનો ભાવ વાંચી ન લે તેથી હું રસોડામાં જઈ ચા બનાવવા લાગી જતી. પછી જલ્દી ચા પતી જાય એ પ્રાર્થના કરતી ઘરના બારણા પાસે ઉભી રહેતી. આ નાની લાગતી વાતોનુ એ સમયે કેટલું મોટું સ્વરૂપ હતું!

એ શનિવારે અમે નવી ખુલેલી કાપડની દુકાને ગયેલા. ડ્રેસ બનાવવા માટે કપડું પસંદ કરવાનુ હતું. “બહેનને પેલા ઉપરના તાકામાંથી બતાવો.” માણસે એકાદ બે ખોલ્યા પણ મારી નજર એક નાજુક લાલ ફૂલોવાળા સફેદ મુલાયમ જ્યોર્જેટ તરફ આકર્ષાઈ. એ ખોલતા મારો ચહેરો ખીલી ઉઠ્યો. મેં બાને કહ્યું, “આ તો લેવું જ છે.” ત્રણ વાર કાપવા માટે માપતા છેલ્લે જરા કાણા દેખાયા. બાને લાગ્યુ કે સારૂ કાપડ નથી. અગ્યાર વર્ષની હું, આંખમાં આંસુ છુપાવવા એક બાજુ જઈ ઉભી રહી. બાએ મારી લાગણી ન દુભાય તેથી સંમતિ આપી કાપડ લઈ આપ્યુ. ખૂબ હોંશથી ડ્રેસ તૈયાર થઈ ગયો અને ‘સાંચવીને ખાસ પ્રસંગે પહેરવાનો’ એવી સલાહ સાથે મારા કબાટના ખાનામાં ગોઠવાયો. એ લાલ ફૂલવાળા સફેદ ડ્રેસને ખોલવો, ને ફરી સંકેલવો, મુલાયમ કાપડ પર નાજુક હાથ ફેરવવો, એ ગમતી પ્રવૃત્તિઓ હતી.

એક દિવસ મારી તબિયત ખરાબ લાગતાં મારા ડોક્ટરમામાને દવાખાને બા લઈ ગયા. એ સમયે બહુ કોમળતા બતાવવાની રીત નહોતી. દવા લઈ ચાલતા ઘરે આવી સુઈ ગઈ. બા નોકરી પર ગયા. આખી બપોર શ્વાસ લેતા ખુબ દર્દ થયું ત્યારે ન્યુમોનિયા એક ગંભીર બીમારી છે એ બધાના ધ્યાનમાં આવ્યુ. પછીના પાંચેક દિવસ કેમ ગયા એની મને સભાનતા નહોતી. જ્યારે આંખ ખોલી જોતી તો મા-બાપુજીના ચિંતિત ચહેરા અને ભાઈ રૂમની અંદર બહાર આવ-જા કરતો દેખાતો. બાને વધારે ચિંતાનુ કારણ એ પણ હતું કે થોડા મહિનાઓ પહેલા જ, બે દિવસના તાવમાં, મારી પાંચ વર્ષની બહેન અમે ગુમાવી હતી. એ આઘાત ઘેરો ઘૂંટાતો હતો.

પાંચમે દિવસે મારી તબિયત જરા સારી લાગતા મને તાજગી લાગે માટે સ્પંન્જ બાથની તૈયારી કરી રહ્યા હતા. મારી નજર કબાટમાં ગોઠવાયેલા રાતા ફૂલોવાળા ડ્રેસ પર અટકી રહી હતી. મારા બા પણ મારી નજરને અનુસરી એક સ્મિત સાથે એ ડ્રેસ જોઈ રહ્યા. પછી મને એ ડ્રેસ પહેરાવ્યો. તાજગી ભરી હું મારા ગમતા ડ્રેસમાં ખુશ હતી અને મારો ભાઈ આવીને મજાક કરતાં, દિવસો પછી, હું ખડખડાટ હસી પડી.

મને સ્વસ્થતા આવતા મારી નજર મારા હાથ પર પડતા ખ્યાલ આવ્યો કે મારો અંગુઠો પાતળો દેખાતો હતો. મને ધ્યાનમાં આવ્યુ કે મારૂ વજન ઘણું ઉતરી ગયું હતું. વાહ! મારૂ સપનુ સાકાર થયું.

મારા આરામ કરવાના દિવસો દરમ્યાન ઘણાં મિત્રો આવતા રહેતા. એમાં એક દિવસ મારી બેનપણી હંસા પણ સંકોચ સાથે આવી. હંસાને મારા માટે બહુ લાગણી હતી પણ, હું એની કિંમત નહોતી કરતી અને નજીવા બહાના નીચે થોડા સમયથી બોલતી નહોતી. મારા બા કહેતા કે સ્નેહની કદર ન કરીએ તો સ્નેહ મળતો બંધ થઈ જાય. મારા અબોલા છતાં ય હંસા મારી ખબર કાઢવા આવી તેથી મારૂ દિલ આભારવશ થઈ ગયું. એ માંદગીના સમયે મને એવી ઘણીં અણજાણ અંતર્હિત લાગણીઓની કદર સમજાઈ.

એ દિવસે મારી તબિયત સારી હોવાથી મેં મારા ગુલાબના છોડને મળવાનુ વિચાર્યુ. મારા આશ્ચર્ય અને આનંદ વચ્ચે એક મજાનુ લાલ ગુલાબ હસી રહ્યુ હતુ. બધાને બતાવવા એને જતનથી ઘરમાં લઈ આવી. પણ સામે જ બા બેઠક પર બેસીને એમની કવિતાની નોટમાં લખી રહ્યા હતા. “બા! લો આ તમારા માટે ભેટ.” બાના મુખ પર એ ગુલાબ જેવું જ હાસ્ય ફરક્યું. બીજા દિવસ પછી ગુલાબ દેખાયું નહીં તેથી એ વિષે હું ભુલી ગઈ. પછી આ ઉત્સાહભરી સુકુમારી અનેક પ્રવૃત્તિઓમાં વ્યસ્ત થઈ ગઈ. વર્ષો સાથે લાલ ફૂલોવાળો સફેદ ડ્રેસ, નાનો પડી ગયો હતો તો પણ, હંમેશા સૌથી વધારે મનગમતો બની રહ્યો.

લગ્ન પછી પરદેશ વાસને લીધે, બા અને જન્મભૂમિની મુલાકાતો વચ્ચે કાળક્રમે અવકાશ વધતો રહ્યો.  ૧૯૯૩માં, બાને છેલ્લી વિદાય આપવા વડોદરામાં ભાઈને ઘેર ભેગા થયેલા. ત્યાર બાદ ભારે હૈયે ભાવનગરના ઘરમાં પ્રવેશ કરતાં ઋજુ લાગણીઓ સ્પર્શી ગઈ. બાના કબાટને ખોલી એમની ગમતી ચીજો સાથે મનથી વાતો કરી રહી હતી. એમાં કપડાં પર પડેલી એમની કવિતાની નોટબુકને મેં સહજ ઉત્સુકતાથી ઉઠાવી અને મૃદુ આંગળીઓથી ખોલી. એમાં જતનપૂર્વક ગોઠવેલું લાલ ગુલાબ! હવે મને ખ્યાલ આવ્યો કે મેં આપ્યુ હતુ એના બીજા દિવસ પછી એ ક્યાં સંતાયેલુ હતું! એ જ પુસ્તકની નીચે મારો લાલ ફૂલોવાળો સફેદ ડ્રેસ! એના પર હાથ ફેરવી એની મુલાયમતા અનુભવી રહી હતી.
અચરજ એ થાય છે કે કાળની નદી વહે જાય છે પણ એ કિશોરી તો અહીં જ ઊભી છે!
એવામાં, વર્ષો સુધી બાનુ કામ કરનાર, સંતોકબહેન એમની પૌત્રી મેના સાથે રૂમમાં દાખલ થયા. ડ્રેસને જોઈને એ બોલ્યા કે, “બાને જ્યારે તમારી બહુ યાદ આવતી ત્યારે આ ડ્રેસને હાથમાં લેતા જોયેલા.”

મેં રેશમી યાદોના પુંજને હાથમાં લઈ દિલની નજીક થોડી ક્ષણો પકડી રાખ્યો અને પછી મેનાને પ્રેમથી આપી દીધો. મેના એની દાદી સાથે ચહેકતી બહાર દોડી ગઈ.

હું બાના લાલ ગુલાબવાળા પુસ્તકને લઈ બચપણની યાદમાં લપેટાઈને બેઠી.

                                        ——————————-

 

Meant to be..

It Was Meant To Be/  મારી રાહ જુએ… My experience

 

It Was Meant To Be…..
It was February 5, 2005. I was attending my seventh annual “Appreciation Lunch” for volunteers, organized by the Literacy Council of Fort Bend in Texas. We had a guest speaker, Mr. Michael Biasini. He was relating his life story, “Overcoming Obstacles,” which could be found in Chicken Soup for the Soul – 6th Edition. At the end of his emotional presentation, he announced, “I want to give this book to the person whose birthday is closest to today.” My birthday happened to be on the 6th, and in my birth-place India, it was already the 6th. So Mr. Biasini presented to me an autographed copy of Chicken Soup for the Soul. I read a few stories and put it away on the bookshelf.

In the next few months, I thought several times about stopping by my neighborhood nursing home. My natural helping aptitude was urging me to do some volunteer work with the elderly residents. Finally, one day in April I went in and inquired. The receptionist was busy doing several things and made me wait for a while. When I expressed an interest in reading to the seniors, she seemed a bit uncertain, but she gave me a contact name and number. After a few attempts over the next few days, I did get hold of that person. Very quickly she told me to “come at 2pm on Monday.”

When I arrived at the home the following Monday, I was received by a young man who led me to a room full of elderly people, most of whom were stricken with Alzheimer’s. He was setting up a movie to show the residents that they had already seen.He said most of the patients did not watch the movie the first time, and those who did forgot it quickly. I was there for about half an hour, but I could not connect with anybody. “What am I doing here?” I asked myself. I decided to leave, but on my way out I ran into the lady in charge. Somehow I heard myself telling her, “I will come back on Friday.” Friday came and I was struggling with myself as to whether I should go back or just forget the whole thing! In the early morning I decided that I would go one more time, and if someone is waiting for me I would find that person.

I entered the home and saw an elderly resident sat there enjoying, “The Price is Right” on television. I proceeded to walk to the same room that had been filled with residents on Monday so that I might find that same young man. I waited around for what seemed like a long time, observing all those patients being helped by the employees, lost in their own worlds. I thought, “That’s it, I tried. I cannot be of any use here.” Coming back to the reception area, I noticed that same elderly lady still sitting near the television with her walker in front of her. I sat next to her and introduced myself to her. She said her name was Helen. She turned out to be very alert and talkative. She knew all about current news events and seemed very smart. She said she enjoyed listening to the television since her eyesight had deteriorated. I told her I would love to come and read to her if she would like! She was totally delighted to hear that. When she found out that I am from India, she excitedly said, “Oh, I know some good Indian people. I like Indian food, especially the “ naan-bread.” She said her friend Nell would also want to join us. I promised her that I will come back to read to them twice a week. I walked out of that nursing home with a smile on my face. I realized in my heart that Helen was waiting for me to come. It was meant to be.

I started planning – what should I read to these ladies! Maybe some magazine? All of a sudden I remembered THAT book. I was sure that these ladies would like to listen to real-life stories. So our first reading session started with “Overcoming Obstacles” from the book Chicken Soup for the Soul.I decided to read to the ladies on Monday and Friday mornings for one hour. That first Friday I went looking for Ms. Helen in her room. She was rushing to meet me. She said she was a little late but next time she would be ready and waiting in the front dining room. From then on she kept her word. Most of the time she would be accompanied by her friend, Ms. Nell. She was a delicate, quiet lady. She loved to read books. She had a little difficulty with her hearing, but she was happy that I was going to read to them. She was eighty-nine years young, one year older than Ms. Helen and forty years senior to me. They both made me feel young, saying, “Oh, you have many years ahead of you.” Ms. Nell was raised on a farm and had worked very hard all her life. Even now in the nursing home she had signed up to help other residents. Ms, Helen would say about her, “Isn’t she a pretty thing! She used to be a model in her younger days.” Upon my inquiries she told me that she used to model clothes for some stores. She was delighted to talk about her lovely daughter, grandchildren and her newborn great-grandchild.

Ms. Helen had worked in a bank. She had lived all her life in upstate New York and recently moved to Houston to be near her children. She would say, “Wherever you live, you have to like it. I like it here.” She was sharp. Whenever I stumbled upon any word, she would promptly give me the meaning of it. She always carried a Bingo game board with her, and as soon they sat at the table, the game would start. Lately she had had a hard time differentiating the dots, so Ms. Nell would help. When I used to bring the naan – the Indian bread – very lovingly she would thank me and share it with whoever was bold enough to try it. Ms. Helen and Ms. Nell valued their friendship dearly.

One day we talked about cremation and burial customs. I told them about our Hindu customs. Ms. Helen said, “A long time ago I had decided to be cremated and have my ashes buried next to my husband in New York State. I don’t want to trouble my mchildren with having to send my body all the way over there.” I was surprised at her clear thinking and her unorthodox attitude. She was so curious to discuss and know about other religions. I would many times read from TIME about the current events and world peace, with enthusiastic participation by the ladies.

One day, Ms. Nell seemed very nervous. She very quietly listened to a story for a while, and then said, “I won’t be here next Monday. The doctor examined my ears and told me to go to his office for some procedure to clean them. He said it will be simple, but I am afraid,” I told her, “Give me your hands.” She put her delicate hands on the table. I held them gently and looking into her eyes told her, ” You will be all right.”  With teary eyes she nodded her head.
The following Friday, when I walked into the dining room, Ms.Nell was all smiles! Excitedly, she told me, “Oh, the procedure did not hurt me and now I can hear so much better.” Our reading sessions continued twice a week.

Ms. Ever started joining us on a regular basis, but there were times she had to leave to help her younger invalid sister. Once, when I was reading a story about a cancer patient, she told us about losing a son to cancer. Accepting this God-given situation was one way for her to achieve peace of mind. Once in a while, some other residents would come and park their wheelchairs next to our table and share their life stories. Often, some of the ladies would be getting manicures by one of the employees during my readings.

One day, I was invited to join a cake party. I came upon one Alzheimer’s patient who was from my country, speaking only in my mother tongue, Gujarati. I sat there holding her hand while she continuously recited a nursery rhyme. It made me feel so humble to realize that the mightiest organ in my body is my brain, and it is so fragile. One day, these people were productive members of the society. Today, they cannot even remember their own names. One lady in another wheelchair was not able to wipe her own mouth, and she was grumbling, “I have to find an apartment – will you help me?”

It was the month of July, and Ms. Helen was looking forward to a trip to attend her granddaughter’s wedding. She returned, very happy from that family reunion. As I listened to her stories, I could see that a positive attitude prevailed in her everyday life. She said, “Everything was so nice, I enjoyed myself.” I never heard any complaints from her. One day, I told her, “I am not close to my daughter-in-law.” Helen asked, “Is your son is happy with her?” I said, “Yes.” 
She said, “Then what’s the problem?” Wow! I was stunned for a while. That was a life time lesson for me. “Then what’s the problem!” 

Months passed by. I also started to read other novels to the residents. But I think that I had received the gift of Chicken Soup for the Soul for the purpose of reading it to these ladies. And I feel their love when very affectionately they ask me, “Now which story are you going to read to us today?”

Saryu Parikh
Note: July 2008. I continued to visit Ms.Nell since Dear Ms.Helen had passed away to cheer another world a few months ago.

————————–

મારી રાહ જુએ…

હ્યુસ્ટનમાં, લીટરસી કાઉન્સીલ તરફથી, બધા સેવા આપનાર માટે  સન્માન કાર્યક્રમ હતો. હું સાત વર્ષથી અંગ્રેજી શીખવવાની સેવા આપતી હતી. છેલ્લા પાંચ વર્ષથી એક મુંગીબહેરી મલેશીયાથી આવેલી કિશોરીને ઈંગ્લીશ શીખવતી હતી. મને “Chicken Soup for the Soul” સત્ય કથાઓનુ પુસ્તક ભેટ મળ્યુ. પહેલી વખત આ પુસ્તકનો પરિચય થયો. ‘સમય મળશે ત્યારે વાંચીશ’ એમ વિચારી એક બાજુ મુકી દીધું.

અમારા ઘરથી નજીકમાં એક ઘરડા ઘર હતુ. હું જ્યારે પણ ત્યાંથી પસાર થતી ત્યારે મને મનમાં વિચાર આવે કે મારે કાંઈક સેવા આપવી જોઈએ. એક દિવસ અંદર જવાના વિચારને અમલમાં મુક્યો. ફોન પર વાતોમાં અટવાયેલ બહેને મને પ્રોગ્રામ ડીરેક્ટર ‘કેથી’ પાસે મોકલી.
મેં એમને કહ્યું, “મદદરૂપ થવા સમય આપીશ, પણ શું કરી શકુ એ ખબર નથી! કદાચ પુસ્તક વાંચુ કે એવુ કાંઈક.” એ મને યાદદાસ્ત ખોયેલા વૃધ્ધોના રૂમમાં લઈ ગયા. મુવી ચાલતી હતી. મને કહેવામાં આવ્યુ કે એક જ  મુવી ચાલે રાખે તો પણ એ જોતા રહે છે. એક વખતના હોશિયાર, ચપળ વ્યક્તિઓની દયનિય દશા!
એક માજી જે પોતાનુ મોં પણ નહોતા લુછી શકતા, એ મારો હાથ પકડી કહે, ‘મારે એપાર્ટમેન્ટ્માં રહેવુ છે. મને શોધી આપને.’ હું પંદર મીનીટ પ્રયત્ન કરતી ફરી પણ મને લાગણીની દોર ન બંધાઈ.

મને કેથીએ પુછ્યું કે ફરી ક્યારે આવીશ? તો અનાયાસ, ‘સોમવારે આવીશ’ એમ કહેવાઈ ગયું.
મને વિચારો સતાવે, ‘હું ત્યાં જઈને શું કરીશ!’ એ પરિસ્થિતિમાં ઘરડાં લોકોને જોવા એ પણ એક કસોટી છે.
અંતે એક ભાવ સ્ફુર્યો. ‘હું ફરી એક વખત જઈશ અને જો કોઈ મારી રાહ જોતુ હશે તો મને મળશે.’
સોમવારે હું ઘરડાં ઘરમાં દાખલ થઈ ત્યારે એક વૃધ્ધા વ્હીલ ચેરમાં બેઠાં હતા. ટીવી પર સમાચાર ચાલુ હતાં. મને એ જ મોટા રૂમમાં લઈ ગયા. મે થોડી મદદ કરવા પ્રયત્ન કર્યો પણ મારી ત્યાં હાજરી નકામી લાગી.
મે મનમાં ગાંઠ વાળી, ‘બસ, પ્રયત્ન કરી છૂટી.’

પાછી આગલા ખંડમાં આવી તો એ વૃધ્ધાની ખુરશી બીજી તરફ હતી અને ટીવી પ્રોગ્રામ રસથી સાંભળતા હતા.
મે એમની નજીકના સોફા પર બેસી વાતચીત ચાલુ કરી, ” મારુ નામ સરયૂ, આપનુ નામ?”
મજાનુ હસીને કહે, “હેલન.” મે જરા શો વિષે વાતો કરી અને તેઓ કેમ જોવાને બદલે સાંભળે છે એમ પુછતા એમણે કહ્યુ કે એમને લગભગ અંધાપો આવી ગયો છે. જ્યારે મારી પાસેથી જાણ્યુ કે હું ભારતિય છું તો ઉત્સાહથી બોલ્યા, “અરે વાહ! હું થોડા ભારતિયને ઓળખું છું. અમે મારી દીકરીના પડોશીને ત્યાં જમવા ગયેલા. મને ખાસ કરીને નાન બહુ ભાવેલી.” મે પુછ્યુ, ” હું અઠવાડીયામાં એકાદ બે દિવસ આવી કાંઈક વાંચન કરૂ તો ગમશે?” એ સાંભળતા એમનો ચહેરો ખીલી ઉઠ્યો, “મારાથી હવે વંચાતુ નથી તેથી એ શોખને વિસારે મુક્યો. જો તમે આવીને વાંચશો તો ખુબ ગમશે. મારા બેનપણી, નેલ પણ આવશે.”

બીજે દિવસે સવારનો સમય નક્કી કરી મે વિદાય લીધી. મનનો ભાવ પુલકિત થઈ કહેતો હતો, ‘હાં, હેલન મારી રાહ જોતી હતી!’
મને મુંઝવણ થઈ કે શું વાંચુ જેથી લગભગ નેવુ વર્ષના બહેનોને રસ પડે. એ વખતે સમજાયું કે પેલુ ભેટ મળેલ પુસ્તક, મને જ કેમ મળ્યુ! મેં નક્કી કરી લીધું કે  “Chicken Soup for the Soul”માંથી સત્ય કથાઓ યોગ્ય રહેશે.
અમે જમવાના રૂમમાં મળવાનું નક્કી કરેલ પણ હેલન ત્યાં નહોતા. હું એના રૂમમાં ગઈ તો એ નર્સને જલ્દી કરવાનુ કહી રહ્યા હતાં. મને કહે કે હવે પછી મને રાહ નહીં જોવડાવે અને ત્યાર પછી લગભગ દરેક વખતે રૂમમાં મારા જતા પહેલા હાજર થઈ જતા.

હેલન ૮૮ વર્ષના, ઉત્સાહી અને હોશિયાર હતા. વાંચતા મને કોઈ શબ્દ ખબર ન હોય તો તરત અર્થ કહેતા. એમને માટે હું નાનરોટી લઈ જતી, જે શોખથી ખાય અને બીજાને પણ આગ્રહથી આપે. બધા વર્તમાન બનાવોથી વાકેફ રહેતા તેથી જુદા સામાયિકોમાંથી રસ પડે તેવું વાંચી સંભળાવું તે સમજણપૂર્વક મ્હાણે.  એક દિવસ મેં કહ્યું કે, ‘પૂત્રવધુ ખાસ નથી રાખતી.” મને પુછે, “દીકરો વહુ ખુશ છે?”  મેં કહ્યુ, “હાં.’
“ધેન વોટ્સ ધ પ્રોબ્લેમ?” વાહ! થોડી વાર તો હું ચમકી ગઈ. “તો પછી મુશ્કેલી શું છે?” જે મારા માટે સૂવાક્ય બની ગયું. 
એમના બેનપણી નેલ પણ આવ્યા જે  હેલન કરતા એક વર્ષ મોટા હતા. પાતળા, ટટ્ટાર અને નાજુક બહેનને જોતા ખ્યાલ આવે કે એક સમયે બહુ દેખાવડા હશે.
હેલેન કહેતા, “છેને મજાની? નાની હતી ત્યારે મોડેલીંગ કરતી.” બન્ને ના બેનપણા પાક્કા હતા. નેલને એક કાને જરા ઓછું સંભળાતુ હતુ. એક દિવસ ઉદાસ જોઈ મેં કારણ પુછ્યું. એ કહે, “આવતી કાલે ડોક્ટર મારા કાનની ઉંડી સફાઈ કરવાના છે એની મને બીક લાગે છે.” મેં એમના બે નાજુક હાથ પકડી, નજર પરોવી કહ્યું કે, “મને કશી તકલિફ નહીં થાય, એ વાક્ય જ યાદ રાખો.” પછી હું એમને મળી ત્યારે ખીલેલા ચહેરા સાથે હસીને કહે, “મને જરાય ન દુખ્યું અને હવે સારુ સંભળાય છે.” એમનો આત્મવિશ્વાસ ચહેરા પર ઝલકતો હતો.  

પછી તો બીજી બહેનો પણ આવીને બેસતી અને અઠવાડીયામાં બે દિવસ સવારે મે વાંચવાનુ ચાલુ કર્યુ અને પાનાઓ દિવસો, મહિનાઓ અને વર્ષોમાં ફેરવાયા. ઘણા પ્રસંગો આવ્યા જ્યારે એમની આંખોના અશ્રુઓ લુછ્યા અને એમની ખુશીમાં હસ્યા. હેલેન, એની પ્રપૌત્રીના લગ્નમાં જવાની હોંશથી તૈયારી કરતા હોય કે લંચ પીઝા માટે બહાર જવાના હોય, દરેક પ્રવૃત્તિમાં પુરા દિલથી જોડાતા. જે દિવસે વાંચવાના રૂમમાં ન આવે ત્યારે આવવાનુ અશક્ય હશે એ નક્કી. હું એમની પાસે જઈને એમને ગમતું કરું. બાજુમાં નેલનો રૂમ હતો તેથી હેલનના ગયા પછી એમને મળવાનુ ચાલુ રહ્યુ. 

હેલનના પરિચયથી મને ઘણુ શીખવા મળ્યુ. એ અહીંથી દૂરના સ્ટેઇટમાં આખુ જીવન રહેલા, પણ એની દીકરી અને દીકરાનુ કુટુંબ ટેક્સાસમાં હોવાથી થોડા વર્ષોથી અહીં રહેતા. એ કહેતા, “મને તો અહીં ગમે છે. હું નસીબદાર છું કે મારા પ્રેમાળ બાળકો મારી સંભાળ લે છે. એમને અગવડ ન પડે એની મારે પણ કાળજી રાખવી જોઈએ. હું મરી જાઉં ત્યારે મને અગ્નિદાહ આપવાનો આદેશ છે તેથી મારા ગામે લઈ જઈ દાટવાના ક્રિયાકર્મ ન કરવા પડે.”
મારા જીવનમાં અને પ્રવૃત્તિઓમાં બન્ને બહેનો ખુબ રસ લેતા. તેઓ મારા આવવાની ઉત્સાહથી રાહ જોતા અને  મને મારા સ્વજનોને મળવા જતી હોઉં એવો ભાવ થતો. હેલન જ્યારે હસતી આંખો સાથે પુછતી, “તો આજે તું શું વાંચવાની છો?” ત્યારે હું લાગણીના દોરે બંધાઈને ત્યાં બેઠી છું એની પ્રતિતી થતી.

                                                                                                                                                     ————————-

પરાવર્તન-સત્યકથા / Turn Aroumd

         પરાવર્તન                 

          અમેરિકામાં ઘણા વર્ષો રહ્યા પછી, મુશ્કેલીમાં મુકાયેલી ભારતિય બહેનોને મદદ  કરતી સેવાસંસ્થા સાથે હું સંકળાયેલ હતી. એ દિવસે ફોન પર શોના નામની બહેનનો દુઃખી અવાજ મદદ માંગતો હતો. વાતચિત પરથી ખ્યાલ આવ્યો કે મરાઠી, હિન્દી અને અંગેજી ભાષા એ જાણતી હતી. મેં એને મળવા બોલાવી અને એની ગાથા સાંભળી.
“મેં તમને મારૂં નામ શોના કહ્યું પણ, મારૂં ભારતિય નામ  દીપિકા  છે.”

         દીપિકા મુંબઈમાં એક પ્રતિષ્ઠિત કુટુંબની હતી. અઢાર વર્ષની ઉંમરનો થનગનાટ અને દૂર દેશના સ્વપ્નાઓનું આકર્ષણ ખાસ કોઈ કારણ વગર સ્વજનો સામે બળવો જગાવી રહ્યા હતા. કોલેજનું પહેલું વર્ષ હમણા પુરું થયેલુ.  એ સમયે ત્રીસેક વર્ષના માણસના પરિચયમાં આવી. પોતે હિંદુ અને એ મુસલમાન અને બીજા બધા ભેદભાવને વિસારે મુકી એની ચાહતમાં ખોવાઈ ગઈ. એની સાથે લગ્ન કરી અમેરિકા આવવા માટે પોતાની ઉંમર, નામ વગેરે અનેક સાંચ જૂઠ કરી, પાછા ફરવાના રસ્તાઓ બંધ કરી, દેશ છોડી, અમેરિકા આવી ગઈ. અહીં નામ શોના રાખ્યુ હતું.

મુંબઈમાં એના પરિવારના સભ્યો લોકોને કહેતા રહ્યા, “દીપિકા અમેરિકા ભણવા ગઈ છે.”
અહીં આવતા જ પોતાની  ‘પિંજરના પંખી’ સમી  દશાની  પ્રતીતિ  થઈ  ગઈ.

એનો પતિ મોટર ગેરેજમાં કામ કરતો હતો. બે વર્ષ પછી એક પુત્રની માતા બની. આ સમય દરમ્યાન પતિની રુક્ષતાનો અનુભવ ચાલુ હતો. એક વખત પોલીસને પણ એણે બોલાવ્યા હતાં.
શોના એક ગીફ્ટ શોપમાં કામ કરતી હતી.  પોતાની હોશિયારી અને ચપળતાથી નોકરી સારી રીતે સંભાળતી હતી. જયારે એ મારી પાસે આવી ત્યારે  એ સ્ત્રી-આશ્રયગૃહમાં ત્રણ મહિનાથી એનાં પાંચ વર્ષના દીકરા સાથે રહેતી હતી. બાળક માતાપિતા વચ્ચે આવ જા કરતો હતો. પોતે નોકરી કરતી હતી અને નર્સ આસીસ્ટન્ટનુ ભણતી હતી. આગળ  ભણી નર્સ  બનવાનુ  એનું  લક્ષ્ય  હતુ.
ઘરમાં ત્રાસ સહન કરીને આવતી બહેનોને અમારા જેવા અજાણ્યા પાસે પોતાની જીવન કહાણી કહેવી એ બહુ જ પીડા જનક હોય છે. શોનાને ત્રણ રીતે મદદની જરૂર હતી. એને  પોતાનું, ભાડાનું ઘર લેવાનુ હતુ.  કોલેજની  ફી  ભરવાની હતી  અને સૌથી  વધારે, વકીલની જરૂર હતી. અમારી સંસ્થાના સભ્યો સામે દરખાસ્ત મુકી. શોનાની ધગશ અને નિશ્ચય વિષે સાંભળ્યા પછી મંજુરી મળી.

                અમે અભ્યાસ માટે અને વકીલ માટે પૂરતી મદદ અને ભાડા માટે અમુક મહિનાઓ સુધી મદદ આપવાનું નક્કી કર્યું. હવે તો એને કોઈ રોકી  શકે  એવો  અવરોધ નહોતો. એનો આત્મવિશ્વાસ અને ધગશ બળવાન હતા.
એનો પતિ એને છોડવા માંગતો નહોતો  તેથી  છૂટાછેડા માટે  શોના ને  જ શરૂઆત કરવી પડી. શોના કહેતી  કે, “મારે મારા બાળકની સંભાળ સિવાય કશું જ નથી જોઈતું.” એ ભણવામાં  અને પોતાના જીવનને વ્યવસ્થિત કરવામાં પૂરા જોશથી વ્યસ્ત થઈ ગઈ. જુદા જુદા કારણો સાથે એના ફોન આવતા રહેતા. કોઈ વખત  બહુ ગભરાઈ જતી. કોર્ટના ધક્કાઓ, મહિનાઓનો વિલંબ અને પરિણામની અનિશ્ચિતતા એને ઘણી વખત  રડાવતા. આવેશમાં  ક્યારેક  કહેતી, “હું મારા દીકરાને લઈને કેનેડા  જતી રહું અને મારો પત્તો જ ન લાગવા દઉં. એને પાઠ  ભણાવવાની  છું.”  એના વિચારોથી મને ચિંતા થઈ જતી. એની સાથે કલાકેક વાતો કરી અને  કેટલી  મુશ્કેલીઓ આવી  શકે  એ સમજાવી, એને શાંત કરી ઘેર મોકલતી. મને એટલી નિરાંત હતી  કે  એ મને પૂછ્યાં વગર કોઈ  પગલું નહીં ભરે.

         ઘણી વખત એનો ઉત્સાહભર્યો અવાજ સંભળાય, “દીદી, મને બધા વિષયોમાં ‘એ’ ગ્રેડ મળી છે.” શોનાને સ્કોલરશીપ મળવાની શરૂ થતાં અમારી સંસ્થાને થોડી રાહત મળી.
ઘણાં મહિનાઓની ખેંચતાણ પછી છૂટાછેડાનુ પરિણામ આવ્યું. બન્ને મા બાપને દીકરાની સરખી જવાબદારી લેવાનો હૂકમ હતો. હવે શોનાને ખૂબ ધીરજ અને કુનેહથી પતિને નારાજ કર્યા વગર રસ્તો કાઢવાનો હતો. કોલેજમાં એને કોઈ અમેરિકન મિત્ર હોવાનો ઈશારો કરેલો. કહેતી હતી કે બહુ વિશ્વાસપાત્ર છે. એક વખત એના પતિના બહુ આગ્રહથી એને ત્યાં  દિવસ રહેવા ગયેલી. બીજે દિવસે કારમાં શોનાને એનો પતિ મારતો હતો એ જોઈ પડોશીએ પોલીસ બોલાવી. ત્યાર પછી એના પતિને અમેરિકા છોડવાની નોટીસ મળેલી. ફરી એ અમેરિકામાં પ્રવેશ ન કરી  શકે એવો પણ હુકમ હતો.

ભારત જતાં પહેલા એના  પતિએ  જીદ કરી  કે, “હું દીકરાને ભારત લઈ જઈશ અને તું પછી આવજે અને હું તને ખુબ મોજમાં રાખીશ.”  શોનાને હા માં હા મીલાવવી પડી કારણકે  ભણવાનુ એક વર્ષ બાકી હતું  અને  પોતાનો  નિર્વાહ  મ્હાણ કરી રહી હતી.  મુંબઈમાં  શોનાને  પોતાની નણંદ પર ભરોસો હતો  કે  એ બાળકને  સાંચવશે. મન  પર  પથ્થર  મુકીને  દીકરાને એના પિતા સાથે  જવા દીધો.
મને વાત કરતી હતી  કે ભારત જઈને  દીકરાને લઈ આવીશ. વકીલની સલાહ લઈને જે તે કામ કરવાની હતી. અશક્ય  લાગતી  યોજના  વિષે  અમે  થોડા  દિવસોમાં  ભૂલી  ગયા.

થોડા મહિનાઓમાં  ફોનની  ઘંટડી  વાગી અને  એનો આનંદથી  ગુંજતો  અવાજ  આવ્યો,
“દીદી! કહો  કેમ હું ખુશ છું? કારણ…. મારો  દીકરો  મારી  બાજુમાં  બેઠો  છે!” હું  આનંદાશ્ચર્ય  સાથે
એની  વાતો  સાંભળી  રહી  હતી.

“મારા દીકરાના  ગયા પછી, નોકરીમાં  બરાબર ધ્યાન આપી સાથે સાથે  ભણવાનું, ધાર્યુ  કામ પૂરું  કર્યુ.  મારા  જીવનનું  લક્ષ્ય સતત  મારા  મન મગજમાં  રમ્યા  કરતું.  મેં  માઈકલ, અમેરિકન મિત્ર, સાથે લગ્ન કરી  નિયમ  અનુસાર  મારો અને બાળકનો પાસપોર્ટ  તૈયાર કરાવી  લીધો.”

શોના  બરાબર યોજના  કર્યા  પછી  ભારત ગઈ  હતી અને એના  માતપિતાની  માફી  માગી પ્રેમથી એમની સાથે રહી. એ  લોકો  પણ  પૌત્રને  મળીને  ખુશ  હતા. મુંબઈમાં, શોના  રોજ  થોડા કલાકો  દીકરાને પોતાના  પિયર લઈ  આવતી  અને  પતિના, ઘર  રાખીને  સાથે  રહેવાના, સપના  સાથે  સમંતિ  આપે  રાખતી. માઈકલ દિલ્હી આવી ગયો હતો અને અમેરિકાની  ત્રણ  ટીકીટૉ  લઈ  રાખી  હતી. નક્કી કરેલા દિવસે, શોના રોજની જેમ દીકરાને લઈને  નીકળી અને મુંબઈથી  સીધી  દિલ્હી  જવા રવાના થઈ ગઈ. પછી  દિલ્હીથી  ત્રણે  જણા  અમેરિકા  આવતા  રહ્યા.
જરા  અટકી ને પછી ગળગળા અવાજે બોલી, “મારા દીકરાને  પિતાના  પ્યારથી  વંચિત નથી  રાખવો,
પણ યોગ્ય પરિસ્થિતિની રાહ જોવી જ રહી. તમારા સૌના સહારે, શોના આજે  ફરી દીપિકા બની છે.”

          સાત વર્ષ  પહેલાં  અણસમજમાં  રસ્તો ભૂલેલી  દીપિકા  પાછી  ફરી, ખંત  અને  વિશ્વાસ સાથે  સાચે  રસ્તે  પગલા માંડી  રહી  હતી.

                                                ———–                         



         અણસમજ

એક    કિશોરી    કરતી    ભૂલ

ખૂંચતી  રહે  જનમભર    શૂલ

મા  એને   મંદિર   લઈ   જાતા
બાપુ  મહત્   મુખી   કહેવાતા
સહજ હતા સુખ ને સગવડતા
મોજ  શોખ   એને   પરવડતા

અધ્યાપનમાં  આગળ   ભણતાં
મુલાકાત   થઈ    હરતા  ફરતાં
યૌવન  જોમ   હ્રદયમાં   છલકે
સપના ખુલી  આંખમાં   હલકે

ભોળું   મન   લલચાવે    વાતો
હિંદુ  મુસ્લીમ   વીસરી   જાતો
ઉંમર  ભેદ   ને   જૂઠી     શર્તો
લેતી   માત્રિ    વિરોધી   રસ્તો

નવો   દેશ   ને  પતિ   પાવરધો
પિંજરમાં   એનાં    વિતે   વર્ષો
બાળ  શિશુસહ  ઉદાસ  આંખો
છૂટવાને      ફડફડતી     પાંખો

 મ્હાણ  પકડતી  હાથ  અજાણ્યા
આત્મજ્ઞાન    શ્રધ્ધાને    જાણ્યા
સપ્તપદીના          સાતવર્ષમાં
બન્યા  હતાં જે  સાવ અજાણ્યા

મડાગાંઠ   જે    પડી    ગયેલી
ખુલી   તોય   ગૂંચવાઇ  પડેલી

ખેંચતાણ   ને    જોરા   જોરી
વચમાં  બાળક   પરવશ   દોરી

સુલજાવીને     વિકટ     વૃત્તને
લઈને     ચાલી    બાળ
 પુત્રને
સ્થિર  ચરણ  ને  દોર   હાથમાં
ઉજ્વલ  ભાવિ  નવા  સાથમાં

જાગ્રત  છે   એ  આજ  પછીથી
જીવનમંત્ર   સત   કર્મ  વચનથી
ફૂલ  કળી  ફરી  નિર્મળ ખીલતી
પ્રેમ  પર્ણ  પર  વાછંટ   ઝીલતી

         ———————-
             Turn Around

I had been a volunteer for a domestic violence organization for many years when one day I received a call requesting help from a young, educated Indian woman. She was calling from a women’s shelter where she had been staying for the last three months with her five-year-old son.

She was a petite, smart-looking young woman. But her face carried lines of worry.  She said, “I told you that my name is Shona, but my given name is Deepika.”

She was from a prestigious family in Mumbai. When she had met her husband, he was 30 and she was only 18 and had just finished her first year of college. As a teenager she had big dreams and was rebellious. When she was given the opportunity to go to America, she forgot that she was a Hindu and he was a Muslim. She thought that she was in love and ignored all the warning signs. They lied about her age and used several other tricks to get her visa. Deepika came to the USA and closed all doors behind her in India. She became Shona.

With tears in her eyes, she said, “My family was so ashamed. They told people that I had gone to the USA for studies.”

Her husband worked in an automobile garage. Shona was working in a gift shop. She had a good relationship with the owner of the shop and did her job well.  But her husband had become abusive. Two years after their marriage, she gave birth to a son. The rough treatment from her husband was hard on her. One time she had to call the police. The situation had become unbearable at home, so she had taken this desperate step of moving to the shelter.

When she came to see me, she had just been informed that she needed to move out of the women’s shelter. She was studying at the local community college to be a nurse’s assistant, and her ultimate goal was to become a nurse.  She was seeking financial and emotional support.  She needed money to rent her own apartment, to pay college fees, and to get a good lawyer. I presented her case to the board of the domestic violence organization. They were impressed by her determination and the desire to become a professional individual. We approved rent money for several months, paid her college fees in full, and found her a lawyer.

Now Shona was able to focus on her studies and her son.  She filed for divorce. She said that she did not want anything except custody of her son. But things have a way of getting complicated. So many times she would call me in total frustration:  the long delays in the court system, the uncertainties and responsibilities.  It concerned me when she said, “I will escape to Canada with my son and make sure that he can never find us. I need to teach him a lesson.” I would try to calm her down and point out the legal problems that would arise for her if she were to do something so desperate. In time, I felt assured that she would not do anything rash.

Now and then I would hear her excited voice on the phone.  “Saryu!  Guess what?  I got A’s in all of my classes!” She received a scholarship for the following semester so it was less of a burden on our organization.

Her divorce was finalized, and Shona got joint custody of their son. She realized that she had to be more careful and maintain cordial relations with her ex. In the meantime, she was getting to know one young man named Michael. She said he was very kind and trustworthy.

Upon her former husband’s insistence, one day she visited him for several hours. But when she was leaving, a neighbor saw him hit her. The neighbor called the police. After that he was ordered to leave the country with no option to re-enter.

But all this time, her ex was confident that Shona would come back to him. He insisted on taking their son back to India with him. He said, “Over there, everything will be back to normal. You come later, and I will keep you in comfort.”  Shona had to agree with a heavy heart. She was barely supporting herself and had at least two more semesters to study. She knew his sister in India would take good care of her son.

Shona secretly married Michael and had prepared the necessary passports for herself and her son. She finished her final exam and flew to Mumbai the next day.

Her ex had rented them an apartment and had made plans for their life together. Shona made peace with her family and let them know her situation. Every day she would take her son to her parents’ house at a specific time. As planned, Michael quietly came to Delhi and booked three tickets to fly back to America.

One day, with the pretext of going to her parents’ house, she left with her son and instead took a flight from Mumbai to Delhi, where they met Michael. From there, Michael, Shona and her son flew safely back to the U.S.

I was surprised to hear her excited voice on the phone. “Saryu! Guess why I sound so happy!  It is because my son is right here sitting next to me. We just got back from India. Thank you for giving me the chance to become Deepika once again.”

I felt the happy vibrations of a mother’s heart.

The veil of desires and greed prevents a person to look at the realities.
The experience leaves the unrepairable bruises long after coming out of the situation. Deepika’s leap without looking has cost her a lot.

————–

Poem-Turnaround

I look around in the lonely night at the lonesome path.
Where did I start, where have I ended up?

I said those lies to become a mistress,
my lies and traps brought deep distress.

I stand and stare at sweet childhood.
I was the one who had closed that door.

Take me back to my home-town,
give me the name which was my own.

Please, let me hold a helping hand,
so I can step into the freedom land.

Shona’s sufferings came to an end,
with love and strength she took a stand.
She paid her dues with great patience,
returned Deepika with her son.

——-

Helping Hand

 

A survivor’s story

I was in America less than three years and was filling up the pages in my diary with my secret tortured life. At the age thirty-five, I left my own business in India and came here to join this new family with many dreams. But in this house I was treated as a slave. I was expected to serve my husband, mother-in-law and teenager stepson with the

preset rules of when, where, how and which way.  I kept on doing all that happily, from 5am to 10pm, with the longing that my husband shows some care for me. I was called stupid because my English was not good and I was humble. I was not allowed to know any thing about household finances or his income. I was giving him all my earnings and in return I was given a small allowance.  The verbal abuse was constant from husband and mother-in-law. My diary was soaked with my lonely tears.
All the people I knew were my husband’s friends and relatives. Whom can I tell and who will believe me?  I cannot write to my family in India because, my in-laws were extremely sensitive about their reputation in society. My husband moved out of our bedroom and told lies to his mother and to the casual, so called, friends. My Ex and his mother started telling me to “pack your bag and get lost”.  They wanted me to leave penniless and humiliated so they can look good in the society. He threatened me with legal consequences.
Finally, I mustered up my courage and talked to one of his friends, who is a Domestic Violence Volunteer. First, I told her very little and waited for her reaction. After a few days I felt that I could trust her. Once I had her support, my self-confidence and strength slowly came back. I had to relearn to be strong. My advocate was my lifesaver. I no longer felt helpless. The Organization helped me with the lawyer’s fees and my advocate spent countless hours with me and accompanied me to get through the legal and emotional web. I moved out of that house with good settlement, with good friends and with dignity. I cannot imagine where I would have been without their help. My mentor Saryu expressed my feelings in her poem.
A Survivor

Painting By: Dilip Parikh

Helping Hand

sis, I accepted strangers as my own,
my heart was full of hopes and dreams,
I came trusting the thread of love,
I enjoyed the bliss of marriage.

He was center of my universe,

He was staying in my inner most verse,
He was the purpose of my being by,
Now miserable cry in my sigh.

That tender string broke in the midst,
Couldn’t mend it with trials or trysts,
He cut it with a jerk, left me hanging helpless,
Now all alone, how to fill this emptiness!

Let the tears flow today due to the hurt,
But my soul lamp will shine inner trust,
Promise, I will find my lost self respect,
With the help of your sweet smile, o’sis!
With the help of your sweet smile.

————–

When you work you are a flute through whose heart the whispering of the hours turns to music.
….And what is to work with love? It is to weave the cloth threads drawn from your heart, even as if your beloved were to wear that cloth………              __Khalil Gibran, The Prophet.

એક પિતાની મૂંઝવણ

 

એક પિતાની  મૂંઝવણ

      “દસેક મીનીટ પહેલા જ અમારા ઘરમાંથી મોહનભાઈ નીકળીને ડાબી તરફ વળ્યા હતાં,તેથી માનુ છું કે મોટા નહેરુ મેદાનમાંથી ચાલતા જતાં હશે. સાયકલ જરા ઝડપથી ચલાવીશ તો પંહોચી જઈશ. હાં, દૂરથી સફેદ ધોતીયું અને સફેદ ઝભ્ભો પહેરેલ નાજુક પાતળા શરીરવાળા માણસ દેખાયા.”

       મંદીરની સાંજની આરતીના મીઠા ઘંટારવ સંભળાતા હતાં.

      એ વખતે હું હાઈસ્કુલમાં  ભણતી હતી. મોટા ભાઈ લગ્ન વયસ્ક થયેલા તેથી અવારનવાર લોકો લગ્ન વિષે વાત કરવા આવતા. એ દિવસે રવિવારની મોડી બપોરે સાંઈઠેક વર્ષના વડીલને ઘરમાં દાખલ થતાં જોઈ અમારા બાને નવાઈ લાગી. એમણે પોતાનો પરિચય “મોહનભાઈ” તરીકે આપ્યો. અમારી નાની જ્ઞાતિમાં ઘણાં લોકોને ઓળખીએ અને જોયે નહિ તો પણ એમની વાતો, કુટુંબનો ઈતિહાસ વગેરે ખબર હોય.

      મોહનભાઈએ વધારે પરિચય આપ્યો એટલે તરત ખ્યાલ આવ્યો, કારણકે ગયા અઠવાડીયે જ મામી કહેતા હતા કે,‘મોહનભાઈને બે દીકરીઓ છે. ભણેલી છે પણ બહુ આઝાદ છે, જરા છકેલી છે. મોટીની બહુ ખબર નથી પણ નાની કોઈ બાપુની સેક્રેટરી તરીકે કામ કરે છે અને સાંભળ્યુ છે કે મોહનભાઈને એમની બહુ ચિંતા છે.’

      મોહનભાઈને જોઈને જ સહાનુભૂતિ થાય એવો સરળ સંસ્કારી દેખાવ. વાતચીત કરવાની નમ્ર રીતભાત જોઈ મારા બા ભાવથી એમના કુટુંબના ખબરઅંતર પૂછી રહ્યા હતા અને તેઓ સંકોચ પૂર્વક જવાબ આપતા હતા.મેં ચા લાવીને આપી તેને ન્યાય આપ્યો. લાંબા સમય સુધી ગોળ ગોળ વાતો ચલાવી. જુદી જુદી રીતે ભાઈ વિષે સમાચાર પુછતાં રહ્યા. અમને ખ્યાલ આવી ગયો કે વાત કઈ દિશામાં જઈ રહી છે! જરા સંકોચ સાથે છેવટે બોલ્યા, “મારી નાની દીકરી ભણેલી ગણેલી છે એને તમારે ઘેર વરાવવી છે, તેથી હા પાડી દો.”
        
        મારા બા કહે, “ અરે, એમ વર કન્યા એકબીજાની પસંદગી ન કરે ત્યાં સુધી મારાથી હા પાડી ના શકાય.”  પણ મોહનભાઈના ચહેરા પરના ભાવ જાણે કહેતા હતા કે, ‘આજે દીકરીનુ નક્કી કરીને જ જવું છે.’ મોહનભાઈ ઊભા થયા. એમની જોળીમાંથી રુપિયો અને નારિયેળ કાઢી મારા બાના હાથમાં પકડાવતાં કહે,  “એ તો પસંદ થઈ જ જશે. મહેરબાની કરીને આજે ના ન પાડતા.” એવું  કંઈક બોલતા ચંપલ પહેરીને ચાલી નીકળ્યા.
        
        મારા બા તો અવાક બની ઊભા રહી ગયા. હું એમના ચહેરા પર અજબની અકળામણ જોઈ રહી. જરા કળ વળતાં કહે, “આ તો ઠીક ન થયુ. મોહનભાઈ લાચાર અને ચિંતિત અવસ્થામાં પરાણે રુપિયો અને નારિયેળ આપી ગયા પણ વાત આગળ ચાલે એવી કોઈ શક્યતા નથી. હવે શું કરશું?”
     
        જરાક વિચાર કરી મેં કહ્યુ, “બા, મને એ વસ્તુઓ આપો, હું એમને પરત કરી આવુ.”
        સંધ્યાનાં  આછા અજવાળામાં બીચારા જીવ ધીરે ધીરે જઈ રહ્યા હતા.
      
        સાયકલ પરથી ઊતરતા મેં કહ્યુ, “મામા, ઊભા રહો. માફ કરજો, પણ મારા બા કહેડાવે છે કે રુપિયો અને નારિયેળ સ્વીકારવાનુ અત્યારે અમારા માટે યોગ્ય નથી.” કહેતા કહેતા એમની જોળીમાં વસ્તુઓ મેં મૂકી દીધી.  
      
       એમના ચહેરા પર નીરાશા છવાઈ ગઈ, પણ “કંઈ વાંધો નહીં” કહી ફીક્કુ સ્મિત આપી વિદાય લીધી.
       
             હું દૂર સુધી એક મૂંઝાયેલ પિતાને જતા જોઈ રહી.  આરતીનો ઘંટારવ સમી સાંજની ગંભીરતામાં વિલીન થઈ  ગયો.
                                                  ————  

The Gold-Fish

                                           The Gold-fish                                 Saryu Parikh

   

               “Wow, what a beautiful fish pendant you have! From where did you get it?”

              Every time I wear this pendant, this curious question brings a smile to my face, carried on the gentle breeze of sweet memories.    The Gold-Fish More

સોનાની માછલી

       

                              સોનાની  માછલી

           ”અરે વાહ! આ સોનાની માછલી તો બહુ સરસ છે, ક્યાંથી આવી?” 

         જ્યારે પણ હું આ સોનાની માછલી ગળાની માળામાં પહેરુ ત્યારે ઉત્સુક સવાલ સાથે મીઠી યાદની લહેરખી સ્મિત લઈ આવે. 

           બાળકો નાના હતાં ત્યારે પ્લેશેન્સિઆ, કેલીફોર્નિયામાં મેં એવોનનુ વેચાણ શરુ કરેલ. એક સાંજે હું માર્ગરેટ કાયલીંગને ઘેર જઈ ચડી. પચાસેક વર્ષની મજાની બહેને મને પ્રસન્નતાપૂર્વક આવકાર આપ્યો અને બે-ચાર ઓર્ડર સરળતાથી આપી દીધા. પછી તો દર બે અઠવાડીએ અમારી મુલાકાતો શરુ થઈ ગઈ. દર વખતે વસ્તુઓ ખરીદી સામે નાના કબાટમાં મુકી દેતી અને વર્ષો સાથે જોયું કે જ્યારે પણ કોઈ મહેમાન હોય ત્યારે એમાંથી બે ત્રણ ભેટો કાઢી, ભાવ તાલ જોયા વગર ખુલ્લા દિલથી આપી દે. એકાદ વર્ષના પરિચય પછી અમે મારા નણંદને લઈને મળવા ગયા તો એમને સુંદર બે ભેટો આપી, જે વર્ષો સુધી દીદીએ ભાવપૂર્વક મ્હાણી.  

              એમની ઉદારતા વિશિષ્ટ હતી. એક પ્રસંગ ખાસ યાદ આવે છે. સમીરના જન્મ પછી, એના બગીચાના ગુલાબોનો મોટો ગુચ્છ અને ડાયપરનુ મોટું કાર્ટન, જેમાં ચોવીસ બોક્સીઝ હતાં, એ લઈને આવ્યા ત્યારે અમે આશ્ચર્યમાં પડી ગયેલા. 

                માર્ગરેટના ઘરમાં એમના પતિ અને બે મજાના સફેદ કૂતરા હતા. પોતે એક હોસ્પીટલમાં એકાઉન્ટટ તરીકે નોકરી કરતા હતા. જ્યારે જર્મનીમાં ભાગલાં પડેલા ત્યારે મ્હાણ બચીને અમેરિકા પંહોચેલા. ઘણી મુશ્કેલીઓ વેઠેલી. એમને બાળકો હતા નહિ. એ મારા બાળકોના પ્રેમાળ નાની બની ગયા. સંગીતા અને સમીર ઉત્સાહથી એને ઘેર જાય અને ચોકલેટ, ભેટો વગેરે લઈ આવે. જન્મદિવસે પણ માર્ગરેટ તરફથી ભેટ આવતી. આમ માર્ગરેટ અમારા કુટુંબનો પ્રેમાળ હિસ્સો બની ગઈ. બાળકો છ આંઠ વર્ષના હતા ત્યાં સુધી માર્ગરેટનો પરિચય જળવાઈ રહ્યો. 

          અમે પાંચ માઈલ દૂરના ઘરમાં રહેવા ગયા અને બાળકો શાળાની પ્રવૃત્તિઓમાં વ્યસ્ત થઈ ગયા. માર્ગરેટ થોડા વર્ષોમાં નિવૃત થઈને હેમીટ , કેલીફોર્નિઆમા રહેવા જતા રહ્યા. થોડા વર્ષો પછી અમે ઓરલાન્ડો, ફ્લોરીડા જતાં રહ્યા. આમ લગભગ તેર વર્ષોના વહાણા વાઈ ગયા. માર્ગરેટને ક્યારેક યાદ કરી લેતા.

          એક દિવસ મને વિચાર થયો કે વાગે તો તીર–પ્રયત્ન કરી જોઊં. મેં હેમીટમાં ટેલીફોન ઓપરેટરર્ને નામ આપી નંબર માંગ્યો અને મારા આશ્ચર્ય વચ્ચે એણે મને નંબર આપ્યો.

         ”હલ્લો, માર્ગરેટ તમે કદાચ નહિ ઓળખો. અમે પ્લસેન્શીઆમાં વર્ષો પહેલા રહેતા હતાં.”

માર્ગરેટ કહે, ” કોણ સરયૂ બોલે છે?”

         મને ખૂબ નવાઈ લાગી. લાગણીવશ થોડીવાર મારો અવાજ અટકી ગયો.પછી તો ઘણી વાતો થઈ. મોબીલ હોમમાં એ એકલા રહેતા હતાં. સ્ટ્રોકને લીધે એક આંખમાં અંધાપાને કારણે લખતા, વાંચતા કે ડ્રાઇવ કરતા તકલિફ પડતી હતી. એમના પતિ બેન્જામીન મૃત્યુ પામેલા જેનુ એમને બહુ દુઃખ લાગતુ હતુ. માર્ગરેટને એક જ બહેન હતા જે જર્મનીમાં હતા. અમે નજદીક હતા એ વર્ષોમા એક યુવાન જર્મન પતિ-પત્ની એમના અંગત મિત્રો હતા. એમના વિષે પુછતાં માર્ગરેટે દુઃખપૂર્વક જણાવ્યુ કે એ બન્ને પોતાના વિમાનના અકસ્માતમાં માર્યા ગયા હતા.

          ” મને રેવા નામના બેનપણી ઘણી મદદ કરે છે. મુશ્કેલીઓ છે તો પણ હું ઘણી સુખી છું.” એમનો આનંદી સ્વભાવ કોઈ પણ સંજોગોમાં પણ, દરેક વખતે ફોન પર,  પ્રસન્નતાનો સંદેશ આપતો. અમે ચારે જણા માર્ગરેટનો ફરી મેળાપ થતા ખુશ થયા. એમના ખાસ પ્રયત્નપૂર્વક લખાયેલ કાર્ડથી અનેરો આનંદ થતો.

            સમીર ગ્રેજ્યુએટ થઈ વકીલ બનવા માટે અભ્યાસ કરતો હતો. વેકેશન નોકરી પૂરી કરી લોસ એન્જેલીસ્ કેલીફોર્નિઆથી કારમાં પાછો ફરવાનો હતો. હું પણ એને સાથ આપવા ગયેલી. અમે ખાસ હેમીટ જઈ માર્ગરેટને મળવાનુ નક્કી કરેલ. સમીર મોટો ફૂલોનો ગુચ્છો પસંદ કરી લઈ આવ્યો. અમને મળીને માર્ગરેટ ખૂબ ખૂશ થઈ. એના મિત્રોને પોતાના કુટુંબના સભ્યોની ઓળખાણ કરાવતી હોય એટલા ગૌરવથી પરિચય આપ્યો. છ ફૂટ ઉંચા સમીર સામેથી તો એની નજર જ ખસતી નહોતી, ” ઓહો! કેટલો મોટો થઈ ગયો!” 

            પછી જ્યારે પણ શક્ય હોય ત્યારે સમીર ફૂલો કે ફળ લઈને જતો અને એ સમય માર્ગરેટને માટે ઘણો આનંદપ્રદ બની ગયો. ફોન પર નિયમિત વાતો થતી. એની એકલતામાં, બને તેટલો, અમે ઉમંગથી સાથ આપતા રહેતા.

    હું છેલ્લી વખત મળી ત્યારે સોનાની માછલી બતાવી મેં પૂછ્યું, “યાદ છે! તમે આ મને ક્યારે આપી હતી?” ઉંમર સાથે ભૂતકાળ ધૂંધળો થઈ ગયેલ. મેં યાદ કરાવતાં કહ્યું કે, એવોનનુ કામ પતાવી હું બહાર નીકળી અને માર્ગરેટ પણ મારી સાથે બહાર આવી વાતો કરતા ઉભા હતાં. વાતમાં એમને યાદ આવ્યુ કે બીજે દિવસે મારો જન્મદિવસ છે. મને કહે એક મીનીટમાં આવુ છુ. અંદરથી સોનાની માછલી લઈને આવ્યા અને પ્રેમથી મને હાથમાં બીડાવી. મને નવાઈ લાગી કે મારી જન્મનિશાની કેવી રીતે! ત્યારે એમણે કહ્યુ કે બેન્જામીનનો પણ ફેબ્રુઆરીમાં જન્મ છે. થોડી પળો મારો હાથ પકડી રાખી ગળગળા અવાજે બોલ્યા હતા, “આ મારે આજે તને જ આપવી છે.” 

        વાત સાંભળી, સફેદ ગુલાબ સમા હાસ્યથી,એમનો ચહેરો ખીલી ઉઠ્યો. પછી ધીમેથી બોલ્યા, ” એ દિવસે મારે આ ઊર્મિશીલ વાત નહોતી કહેવી પણ આજે જરુર કહીશ. એ સમયે હું પંદરેક વર્ષની હતી. લડાઈના સમયમાં હું અને મારી બહેન મારા માસી સાથે આવીને સંતાયા હતા. સ્વતંત્રતા અને સલામતી માટે અમે બીજા દેશમાં ભાગી જવાના હતા એ  રાત્રે મારા માસીએ મને છેલ્લી વખત ભેટીને આ સોનાની માછલી આપી હતી. મને ભય હતો કે મારી નાની બેગ કોઈ ખેંચી લેશે તેથી હાથની મુઠ્ઠીમાં પકડીને સાથે લઈ આવી હતી. આજે એને તારી પાસે સલામત જોઈને યોગ્ય વ્યક્તિને આપ્યાનો સંતોષ થયો.” 
         

        આજે તો માર્ગરેટ નથી પણ એની યાદોની સુવાસ અમારા દિલને ભરી દે છે. તમે કોઈને જીવનમાં નિર્મળ પ્રેમ આપ્યો હોય તો તે બમણો થઈ તમને આવી મળે છે.

 

 

It Was Meant To Be-—

                                                It Was Meant To Be….. 

                     It was February 5, 2005. I was attending my seventh annual “Appreciation Lunch” for volunteers, organized by the Literacy Council of Fort Bend in Texas. We had a guest speaker, Mr. Michael Biasini. He was relating his life story, “Overcoming Obstacles,” which could be found in Chicken Soup for the Soul – 6th Edition. At the end of his emotional presentation, he announced, “I want to give this book to the person whose birthday is closest to today.” My birthday happened to be on the 6th, and in my birth-place India, it was already the 6th. So Mr. Biasini presented to me an autographed copy of Chicken Soup for the Soul. I read a few stories and put it away on the bookshelf.       

                    In the next few months, I thought several times about stopping by my neighborhood nursing home. My natural helping aptitude was urging me to do some volunteer work with the elderly residents. Finally, one day in April I went in and inquired. The receptionist was busy doing several things and made me wait for a while. When I expressed an interest in reading to the seniors, she seemed a bit uncertain, but she gave me a contact name and number. After a few attempts over the next few days, I did get hold of that person. Very quickly she told me to “come at 2pm on Monday.”

                   When I arrived at the home the following Monday, I was received by a young man who led me to a room full of elderly people, most of whom were stricken with Alzheimer’s. He was setting up a movie to show the residents that they had already seen. He said most of the patients did not watch the movie the first time, and those who did, forget it quickly. I was there for about half an hour, but I could not connect with anybody. “What am I doing here?” I asked myself. I decided to leave, but on my way out I ran into the lady in charge. Somehow I heard myself telling her, “I will come back on Friday.” Friday came and I was struggling with myself as to whether I should go back or just forget the whole thing! In the early morning I decided that I would go one more time, and if someone is waiting for me I would find that person.

                   I entered the home and saw an elderly resident  sat there enjoying, “The Price is Right” on television. I proceeded to walk to the same room that had been filled with residents on Monday, so that I might find that same young man. I waited around for what seemed like a long time, observing all those patients being helped by the employees, lost in their own worlds. I thought, “That’s it, I tried. I cannot be of any use here!”  Coming back to the reception area, I noticed that same elderly lady still sitting near the television with her walker in front of her. I sat next to her and introduced myself to her. She said her name was Helen. She turned out to be very alert and talkative. She knew all about current news events and seemed very smart. She said she enjoyed listening to the television since her eyesight had deteriorated. I told her I would love to come and read to her if she would like! She was totally delighted to hear that. When she found out that I am from India, she excitedly said, “Oh, I know some good Indian people. I like Indian food, especially the   “ naan-bread.”   She said her friend Nell would also want to join us.  I promised her that I will come back to read to them twice a week. I walked out of that nursing home with a smile on my face. I realized in my heart that Helen was waiting for me to come. It was meant to be…..

                I started planning – what should I read to these ladies!  Maybe some magazine? All of a sudden I remembered THAT book. I was sure that these ladies would like to listen to real-life stories. So our first reading session started with “Overcoming Obstacles” from the book Chicken Soup for the Soul. I decided to read to the ladies on Monday and Friday mornings for one hour. That first Friday I went looking for Ms. Helen in her room. She was rushing to meet me. She said she was a little late but next time she would be ready and waiting in the front dining room. From then on she kept her word. Most of the time she would be accompanied by her friend,  Ms. Nell. She was a delicate, quiet lady. She loved to read books. She had a little difficulty with her hearing, but she was happy that I was going to read to them. She was eighty-nine years young, one year older than Ms. Helen and forty years senior to me. They both made me feel young, saying, “Oh, you have many years ahead of you.” Ms. Nell was raised on a farm and had worked very hard all her life. Even now in the nursing home she had signed up to help other residents. Ms, Helen would say about her, “Isn’t she a pretty thing! She used to be a model in her younger days.” Upon my inquiries she told me that she used to model clothes for some stores. She was delighted to talk about her lovely daughter, grandchildren and her newborn great-grandchild.

                 Ms.Helen had worked in a bank. She had lived all her life in upstate New York and recently moved to Houston to be near her children. She would say, “Wherever you live, you have to like it. I like it here.” She was sharp. Whenever I stumbled upon any word, she would promptly give me the meaning of it. She always carried a Bingo game board with her, and as soon they sat at the table, the game would start. Lately she had had a hard time differentiating the dots, so Ms. Nell would help. When I used to bring the naan – the Indian bread – very lovingly she would thank me and share it with whoever was bold enough to try it. Ms. Helen and Ms. Nell valued their friendship dearly.

                  One day we talked about cremation and burial customs. I told them about our Hindu customs. Ms. Helen said, “A long time ago I had decided to be cremated and have my ashes buried next to my husband in New York State. I don’t want to trouble my children with having to send my body all the way over there,” I was surprised at her clear thinking and her unorthodox attitude. She was so curious to discuss and know about other religions. I would many times read from TIME about the current events and world peace, with enthusiastic participation by the ladies. 

                 One day, Ms.Nell seemed very nervous. She very quietly listened to a story for a while, and then said, “I won’t be here next Monday. The doctor examined my ears and told me to go to his office for some procedure to clean them. He said it will be simple, but I am afraid,” I told her, “Give me your hands.” She put her delicate hands on the table. I held them gently and looking into her eyes told her,” You will be all right.” With teary eyes she nodded her head.              
              The following Friday, when I walked into the dining room, Ms.Nell was all smiles! Excitedly, she told me, “Oh, the procedure did not hurt me and now I can hear so much better.” Our reading sessions continued twice a week.

             Ms. Ever started joining us on a regular basis, but there were times she had to leave to help her younger invalid sister. Once, when I was reading a story about a cancer patient, she told us about losing a son to cancer. Accepting this God-given situation was one way for her to achieve peace of mind. Once in a while, some other residents would come and park their wheelchairs next to our table and share their life stories. Often, some of the ladies would be getting manicures by one of the employees during my readings.

              One day, I was invited to join a cake party. I came upon one Alzheimer’s patient who was from my country, speaking only in my mother tongue, Gujarati. I sat there holding her hand while she continuously recited a nursery rhyme. It made me feel so humble to realize that the mightiest organ in my body is my brain, and it is so fragile. One day, these people were productive members of the society. Today, they cannot even remember their own names. One lady in another wheelchair was not able to wipe her own mouth, and she was grumbling, “I have to find an apartment – will you help me?”

               It was the month of July, and Ms. Helen was looking forward to a trip to attend her granddaughter’s wedding. She returned, very happy from that family reunion. As I listened to her stories, I could see that a positive attitude prevailed in her every day life. She said, “Everything was so nice, I enjoyed myself.” I never heard any complaints from her.

               Months passed by. I also started to read other novels to the residents. But I think that I had received the gift of Chicken Soup for the Soul for the purpose of reading it to these ladies. And I feel their love when very affectionately they ask me, “Now which story are you going to read to us today?”

Saryu Parikh

Note: July 2008. I continue to visit Ms.Nell since, Dear Ms.Helen had passed away to cheer another world.

—————————

%d bloggers like this: